Nathaniel Thompson (aka nthompson)
Nathaniel Thompson Currently living in Los Angeles, I founded the site Mondo Digital in 1998 and worked as a DVD producer and marketer at Image Entertainment during the format's golden age from 1999 to 2010. Afterwards I was a content producer for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, so I have lots of Oscar stories. I'm also the author of the four-volume DVD Delirium book series from FAB Press, and my writing has regularly appeared at TCM and in Video Watchdog. I have contributed audio commentaries to dozens of films ranging from The Sentinel to Red Scorpion and appear in such documentaries as King Cohen: The Wild World of Filmmaker Larry Cohen and It Was a Colossal Teenage Movie Machine: The American International Pictures Story.
Posts by Nathaniel Thompson

To view Black Jesus click here. I’d honestly be shocked if more than a handful of people around here have heard of Black Jesus (1968) before today. Barely released in American theaters by one-shot outfit Plaza Pictures and never given a legitimate home video release (ignore the bootleg DVDs), this is a rough, tough and […]

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To view Ugly, Dirty and Bad click here. Of the major names in the film world who passed away in 2016, one that got overlooked a bit, at least among Americans, was Ettore Scola. A tricky guy to pin down over the course of his career, Scola was largely regarded as a comedy director but […]

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To view Forever Amber click here. Now here’s a film with three of my favorite things from 1940s movies: Linda Darnell, Otto Preminger and blazing Technicolor. Seen today it’s hard to believe Forever Amber (1947) was a major scandal in the Hollywood press when the opulent 20th Century Fox period piece ran into trouble with the […]

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To view Went the Day Well? click here. It always warms my heart to see how many Ealing Studios films we have stacked around here at FilmStruck. Rivaled perhaps only by Hammer Film Productions, it’s one of the most-loved brand names in British cinema, especially in its native country, and one I’ve happily brought up […]

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To view The Man Who Haunted Himself click here. A couple of weeks back I took a look at a neglected but stunning early entry in the career of Basil Dearden, Frieda(1947), and now it’s time to go all the way to the other end of his career with his very last feature film: The […]

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To view The Slipper and the Rose click here. For some movies, finding a receptive audience is all a matter of timing, Upon its initial release, The Slipper and the Rose (1976), a sterling reinterpretation of the Cinderella story, missed its window of opportunity because it came out after a string of box office disasters […]

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To view Frieda click here. It’s funny how little things can make us happy, and I’m pretty giddy that we have a wealth of cinematic riches available on FilmStruck right now highlighting the very underappreciated work of director Basil Dearden. We’ve got eleven of his films, running the entire spectrum of his career, and you […]

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To view Heaven Can Wait click here. It’s funny how film scores go through stylistic transformations every decade, and how you can almost always pinpoint the year a film was made (within a year or two) based on the music you hear. Case in point: Dave Grusin, whose sound was so omnipresent in the 1970s […]

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To view Betty Blue click here. We might have a few NSFW films lurking around here at FilmStruck (1974′s Sweet Movie springs to mind right off the bat), but for my money, nothing you could watch here at this moment combines the beautiful and the shocking in quite the same way as Betty Blue (1986). […]

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To view The Others click here. A couple of weeks ago, British newspaper The Guardian provoked some vocal reactions from more than a few film fans with an article called “How post-horror movies are taking over cinema,” which made the case that the recent spate of indie films dealing with supernatural tropes represents some evolutionary […]

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