Nathaniel Thompson (aka nthompson)
Nathaniel Thompson Currently living in Los Angeles, I founded the site Mondo Digital in 1998 and worked as a DVD producer and marketer at Image Entertainment during the format's golden age from 1999 to 2010. Afterwards I was a content producer for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, so I have lots of Oscar stories. I'm also the author of the four-volume DVD Delirium book series from FAB Press, and my writing has regularly appeared at TCM and in Video Watchdog. I have contributed audio commentaries to dozens of films ranging from The Sentinel to Red Scorpion and appear in such documentaries as King Cohen: The Wild World of Filmmaker Larry Cohen and It Was a Colossal Teenage Movie Machine: The American International Pictures Story.
Posts by Nathaniel Thompson

To view The Slipper and the Rose click here. For some movies, finding a receptive audience is all a matter of timing, Upon its initial release, The Slipper and the Rose (1976), a sterling reinterpretation of the Cinderella story, missed its window of opportunity because it came out after a string of box office disasters […]

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To view Frieda click here. It’s funny how little things can make us happy, and I’m pretty giddy that we have a wealth of cinematic riches available on FilmStruck right now highlighting the very underappreciated work of director Basil Dearden. We’ve got eleven of his films, running the entire spectrum of his career, and you […]

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To view Heaven Can Wait click here. It’s funny how film scores go through stylistic transformations every decade, and how you can almost always pinpoint the year a film was made (within a year or two) based on the music you hear. Case in point: Dave Grusin, whose sound was so omnipresent in the 1970s […]

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To view Betty Blue click here. We might have a few NSFW films lurking around here at FilmStruck (1974′s Sweet Movie springs to mind right off the bat), but for my money, nothing you could watch here at this moment combines the beautiful and the shocking in quite the same way as Betty Blue (1986). […]

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To view The Others click here. A couple of weeks ago, British newspaper The Guardian provoked some vocal reactions from more than a few film fans with an article called “How post-horror movies are taking over cinema,” which made the case that the recent spate of indie films dealing with supernatural tropes represents some evolutionary […]

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To view Ashes and Diamonds click here. Is it possible for a film to be revered as a world classic and influence an entire generation of its country’s filmmakers yet still be underrated? In the case of Ashes and Diamonds (1958), the best-known film from the great Andrzej Wajda (whom we lost last year), the […]

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To view Hour of the Wolf click here. It’s still a bit of a kept secret that almost every great world director from the 1960s and 1970s made a horror film at some point. Fellini and Malle did it. So did Kubrick. And, yes, Ingmar Bergman has one, too, even if you don’t count the […]

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To view Queen Margot click here. Anyone who read my appraisal of The Brontë Sisters (1979) a little while ago shouldn’t be surprised that one of my favorite actresses of all time is Isabelle Adjani, who had a significant impact on my young moviegoing mind in the 1980s and early 1990s. Her list of towering […]

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To view The Servant click here. It’s usually compelling for movie fans to see an actor trying to break out of a mold into which they’ve been cast by the public, and few did it so successfully or aggressively as Dirk Bogarde. Though he’d built up a strong reputation among critics and cineastes in the […]

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To view Jeffrey click here. There’s something special about the wave of LGBT-friendly indies that swept into theaters in the mid-1990s, and it’s not hard to see why. Rapid changes were starting to take place in a community driven to fiery activism by the catastrophic onslaught of AIDS in the previous decade, and the news […]

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