Jill Blake
Jill Blake Jill Blake is an Atlanta-based freelance writer and co-founder & senior editor at  The Retro Set. She was also the film editor at the pop culture website CC2K until its closure in Summer 2016. In January 2015, Jill and her Retro Set colleagues successfully hosted a film screening and after-party at Cinefamily's Silent Movie Theatre in Los Angeles. In 2012, she was interviewed on-air by Turner Classic Movies host Ben Mankiewicz, and a featured guest on the TCM podcast in 2013. Jill is currently researching the careers of actor Fredric March and his wife, actress Florence Eldridge for an upcoming project. In her spare time, Jill is a stay-at-home mom, wife, fried okra connoisseur, and the neighborhood’s own L.B. Jeffries. Follow Jill on Twitter at @biscuitkitten
Posts by Jill Blake

To view The Apartment click here. Sometimes the saddest stories are the most beautiful. Life is never easy or clear cut, and we all know that there’s often sorrow found on the road to happiness. In The Apartment (1960), director Billy Wilder takes two decent, lonely, broken people looking for real love, and cultivates their developing […]

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To view The Passionate Friends click here. A few months ago, here on Streamline, I wrote about David Lean’s film adaptation of Noël Coward’s Blithe Spirit in 1945 (you can read it here), and how it is among very few films I consider perfect. As I’ve been reintroduced to much of Lean’s early directorial efforts, […]

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To view Hans Christian Andersen click here. I have a confession to make, and this is just between us, ok? Up until a few months ago, I had never seen a Danny Kaye film. Not a single one. And before you think I’m accidentally forgetting White Christmas (1954) –nope. Never seen that one, either. For […]

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To view Targets click here. A few years ago, a friend convinced me to buy, sight unseen, Peter Bogdanovich’s directorial debut, 1968′s Targets starring Boris Karloff. Because of the newly released DVD, there had been renewed interest in this rarely seen film. My friend promised that it would be money well spent, and that it […]

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To view Perfect Understanding click here. In 1929, after a successful career in silent film and at the height of her popularity, Gloria Swanson was preparing for her transition to “talkies,” the earliest, raw experiments in bringing sound to motion pictures. Her sound debut was in the 1929 drama written and directed by Edmund Goulding, The […]

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To view Death Race 2000 click here. When I was a kid, probably thirteen or fourteen, my mom and I would often spend Friday nights staying up late watching television. We would watch Letterman and weird infomercials. Sometimes we would catch a late-night movie—like The Birds (1963), or the utterly ridiculous made-for-TV movie The Boy in the […]

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To view The Made Me a Fugitiveclick here. Brazilian filmmaker Alberto Cavalcanti had quite an interesting career. After several years directing films in France, the director signed a contract with the prestigious Ealing Studios in England. While Cavalcanti only made a handful of films at the studio before departing due to a contract dispute, his […]

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To view Gunga Din click here. It’s summertime, which means we’re eyeball deep in the season of the blockbuster. These popcorn flicks widely vary in quality and entertainment value, but they all have one thing in common: they make money. And if they don’t make enough money during their run in the theater, they’ll rake […]

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To view Victim click here. In late 19th century England, the Criminal Law Amendment Act was implemented, not only banning homosexuality, but making it a criminal offense. For decades, this senseless, discriminatory and repulsive law targeted, and subsequently ruined, the lives of countless gay men in England. Fear of becoming social outcasts, these men were […]

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To view Bigger Than Life click here. In 1955, Nicholas Ray made the technicolor family drama Rebel Without a Cause, which focused on the experiences of teenagers in the seemingly perfect confines of postwar suburbia. The film was not only a huge success, but it helped to make its star, James Dean, a household name, […]

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