Delving Into Delmer Daves

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Delmer Daves is having a moment. The Criterion Collection, the closest thing the U.S. has to a cultural gatekeeper, just released 3:10 To Yuma (1957) and Jubal (1956) on DVD and Blu-Ray, while the Anthology Film Archives in New York City is holding a mini-retrospective of rarely screened Daves titles, including Pride of the Marines (1945) and The Red House (1947). I had never delved into the director’s work because the ambivalent words of Andrew Sarris and Manny Farber were ringing in my head. Sarris thought his films had “stylistic conviction in an intellectual vacuum”, while Farber positioned Daves against the Spartan “Hawks-Wellman tradition” as  “a Boys Life nature lover who intelligently half-prettifies adolescents and backwoods primitives.” While encapsulating their writing approaches, Sarris’ lucidity versus Farber’s contradictory collisions, they both convey images of shallow postcard beauty. Then I saw Daves’ extraordinary The Hanging Tree (1959, on DVD from the Warner Archive), which uses a cliffside cabin as a visual metaphor for Gary Cooper’s moral atrophy, and realized his use of landscape is far more complex than Boys Life kitsch. Eager for more, I watched five Daves films over the weekend, which revealed a sensitive director of actors drawn to tales of regeneration both spiritual and physical.

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On the surface Pride of the Marine appears to be a basic WWII propaganda programmer, telling the true story of working class Philadelphia boy Al Schmid (John Garfield) and his path to winning the Navy Cross for his actions in a battle at Guadalcanal, which blinded him. But Daves and screenwriter Albert Maltz (later blacklisted) are more concerned with Schmid’s fragile psyche than his kill count (200 in one night, reportedly). Much time is spent on location in Philly with Schmid’s combative courtship of Ruth (Eleanor Parker), establishing the cocoon atmosphere of life in the pre-War States. The scene in which news of the Pear Harbor bombing breaks on the radio is one of blithe self-absorption. It’s during a dinner party with Schmid and his friends and they think Pearl Harbor is located in Jersey, their whole world limited to the northeast U.S. After the battle, shot like a horror movie in quiet and shadow, Schmid is forced to discover the world anew as a blind man. He becomes bitter and withdrawn, resentful of the U.S. for sending him into that abattoir, and awakening to the racial inequalities of American life. His best pal Lee is Jewish and informs him that as a blind man Schmid would have an easier time getting a job than himself. It is only Ruth’s compassion that can re-integrate him into society, and prevent him from succumbing to nihilism. Schmid is one of many emotionally enclosed Daves protagonists forced to open up due to physical debility.

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The same is true of Edward G. Robinson in The Red House (’47), a delirious farmhouse thriller in which Robinson ritualistically intones, “don’t go into the woods”. An aging patriarch with a wooden leg, he lives with his spinster sister (Judith Anderson) and his adopted daughter Meg (Allene Roberts). Living in an isolated cabin (as alone as Cooper’s cabin in The Hanging Tree), they rarely venture into town, causing rumors to swirl. Robinson is repressing a terrible secret, and he moves with such coiled deliberation it seems he’ll break into a sweat with each utterance. The film locks into such a hypnotic rhythm it could be mistaken for tedium – it’s a series of seized-up Robinson warnings followed by Meg and her young boyfriend Nath (Lon McCallister) searching the woods for a mythical “Red House”. The landscape takes on a menacing character, as filled with traps as the world outside Philly is for Schmid. Once the circular plot breaks open and Robinson’s secret is revealed, a preternatural calm sweeps across his face as death rises to greet him.

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Broken Arrow (1950) returns the social concerns of Pride of the Marines, with a script from the now blacklisted Albert Maltz fronted by Michael Blankfort, who received the credit. It is generally regarded as the first Hollywood film to give a sympathetic portrayal of Native Americans, although numerous Bs as well as John Ford’s Fort Apache (1948) could also make that claim. It displays Daves’ obsession for historical detail (he consulted his grandfather’s diaries, who crossed the country in a covered wagon), shooting the story of Cochise close to where he actually lived, on the Apache White River Reservation and the Coconino National Forest in Arizona. The setting is overwhelmingly beautiful in Technicolor, shot by Ernest Palmer, that does have a picture postcard prettiness, a fantasy land for this alternate history in which Apaches and Americans live in peaceful assimilationist harmony.

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The Criterion release Jubal (1956) returns to Dave’s theme of renewal, the first of three such Westerns he would make with Glenn Ford. Daves co-wrote the screenplay about vagabond cowboy Jubal (Ford) found starving in the woods by  thriving farm owner Shep (Ernest Borgnine). Jubal builds up his strength and self-respect until he becomes foreman, and begins to woo the daughter of a Mormon minister. Shep’s bored housewife Mae (Valerie French) wants a renewal of her own, leading to a destructive jealousy. This is another of Daves’ isolated locales, a tight grouping of Shep’s home, work bunks and stables nestled in the Grand Tetons of Wyoming. These buildings are together but separate, the crossing their boundaries causing dissension among the farmhands. The main dissenter is Pinky, played with perverse artifice by Rod Steiger.As Kent Jones notes in his DVD booklet essay, “It’s odd to watch the actor stretch every syllable as far as it can go (“nothing” becomes “nuh-thiiiiiihn”)”. This method madness is a poor fit for the naturalistic presences of Ford (deliberate and reticent) and Borgnine (who is spectacular as a garrulous innocent), but is still fascinating to watch to see how he chews off each particular scene.

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Jack Lemmon also seems like a poor fit for the Daves universe, but in Cowboy (1958) he gives a nuanced performance as another damaged Daves loner sliding into self-pity. He stars alongside Ford in a cattle drive odd couple. Lemmon is a Chicago hotel clerk ready to light out for Mexico to chase a girl. Ford is an arrogant, usually rich cattle trader who agrees to take on tenderfoot Lemmon after a generous cash investment. Ford suffers the physical ailment, getting punctured by an arrow, while Lemmon suffers a spiritual malaise, his clumsy urban neurotic becoming a self-destructive wretch after completing his first drive, his romantic dreams of cowboy life dissolved in cow shit and snake bites.  Again concerned with the textures and rhythms of that historical period, Daves adapted Frank Harris’ semi-autobiographical 1930 novel On the Trail: My Reminiscences as a Cowboy. The film is littered with process, from how to put on chaps to how to make a steer stand up in a moving train car. Showing a light touch he would use in his 1960s romances, the film turns into a love story between Ford and Lemmon, as they recognize each other’s frailties in themselves. It ends with a shot of them in matching bathtubs, equality achieved at last.

25 Responses Delving Into Delmer Daves
Posted By robbushblog : May 14, 2013 12:22 pm

These all sound great, but The Red House really interests me. I don’t think I’ve ever heard of it. I must check it out now. Broken Arrow has always been on my radar, since it stars my favorite actor and also features Debra Paget (sigh….) to boot.

Posted By robbushblog : May 14, 2013 12:22 pm

These all sound great, but The Red House really interests me. I don’t think I’ve ever heard of it. I must check it out now. Broken Arrow has always been on my radar, since it stars my favorite actor and also features Debra Paget (sigh….) to boot.

Posted By Kingrat : May 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Sarris and Farber miss the target at least as often as they hit it. Sarris has his likes and dislikes pre-arranged for him by the French auteurists, but Farber’s eccentricity is at least his own.

Thank you for an excellent piece about an undervalued director. THE HANGING TREE and 3:10 TO YUMA are excellent, KINGS GO FORTH is quite good if you can accept Natalie Wood as a mixed-race French girl, and I’ll take A SUMMER PLACE over Sirk’s IMITATION OF LIFE any day.

Posted By Kingrat : May 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Sarris and Farber miss the target at least as often as they hit it. Sarris has his likes and dislikes pre-arranged for him by the French auteurists, but Farber’s eccentricity is at least his own.

Thank you for an excellent piece about an undervalued director. THE HANGING TREE and 3:10 TO YUMA are excellent, KINGS GO FORTH is quite good if you can accept Natalie Wood as a mixed-race French girl, and I’ll take A SUMMER PLACE over Sirk’s IMITATION OF LIFE any day.

Posted By AL : May 14, 2013 4:56 pm

THE RED HOUSE–Miklos Rosza, Julie London

Posted By AL : May 14, 2013 4:56 pm

THE RED HOUSE–Miklos Rosza, Julie London

Posted By Mike McCrann : May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

1947 was the great year in the career of Delmer Daves. He directed Dark Passage with Bogart and Bacall and The Red House. Dark Passage has always been my fave of the 4 Bogart/Bacall films. The SF location work is superb and the Art Deco Apartment on New Montgomery Street (just below Coit Tower) is still there and looks exactly the same. A few years ago I saw it and you could even use the elevator and go to the same floor that Bacall lived in. Of course, the interior of the apartment was a set in Burbank but the outside of the building and the hallways with the class wall were used during the filming. The Red House is finally out on a decent DVD after years of wretched public domain prints. Edward G is great but the young stars are wonderful. You can see Julie London and Rory Calhoun at their gorgeous young best. A lot of the later Daves films were pretty soapy but great guilty pleasures like A Summer Place and Rome Adventure. A very interesting post.

Posted By Mike McCrann : May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

1947 was the great year in the career of Delmer Daves. He directed Dark Passage with Bogart and Bacall and The Red House. Dark Passage has always been my fave of the 4 Bogart/Bacall films. The SF location work is superb and the Art Deco Apartment on New Montgomery Street (just below Coit Tower) is still there and looks exactly the same. A few years ago I saw it and you could even use the elevator and go to the same floor that Bacall lived in. Of course, the interior of the apartment was a set in Burbank but the outside of the building and the hallways with the class wall were used during the filming. The Red House is finally out on a decent DVD after years of wretched public domain prints. Edward G is great but the young stars are wonderful. You can see Julie London and Rory Calhoun at their gorgeous young best. A lot of the later Daves films were pretty soapy but great guilty pleasures like A Summer Place and Rome Adventure. A very interesting post.

Posted By Rick29 : May 14, 2013 7:54 pm

It’s awesome to see someone else writing good things about Delmer Daves, a truly under-appreciated writer-director. THE HANGING TREE is probably his best film and displays his uncanny ability to integrate locations and music into his works. But I also admire his soaps and find them superior to Sirk’s in every way. In fact, I highlighted that in a recent post: http://www.classicfilmtvcafe.com/2013/04/douglas-sirk-vs-delmer-daves-for-king.html

Posted By Rick29 : May 14, 2013 7:54 pm

It’s awesome to see someone else writing good things about Delmer Daves, a truly under-appreciated writer-director. THE HANGING TREE is probably his best film and displays his uncanny ability to integrate locations and music into his works. But I also admire his soaps and find them superior to Sirk’s in every way. In fact, I highlighted that in a recent post: http://www.classicfilmtvcafe.com/2013/04/douglas-sirk-vs-delmer-daves-for-king.html

Posted By G.H. Lewmer : May 15, 2013 1:34 pm

You should check out “The Badlanders” A fantastic genre piece that is indescribably enjoyable.

Posted By G.H. Lewmer : May 15, 2013 1:34 pm

You should check out “The Badlanders” A fantastic genre piece that is indescribably enjoyable.

Posted By april : May 15, 2013 4:24 pm

Thank you for giving Mr. Daves some well deserved attention. I agree with the commentator’s praise for “Dark Passage”, which I like at least as much as “To Have and Have Not” and “Key Largo”. “The Hanging Tree” is my favorite of all Daves’ films, and contains one of Gary Cooper’s most interesting performances. After that, I like “Kings Go Forth”. Many fine actors (Bogart, Cooper, Sinatra, Ford—even Sandra Dee in “A Summer Place”) did some of their finest work in a Daves’ productions. The description of Steiger’s style as “perverse artifice” in “Jubal” is delightful!

I also recommend “The Red House”…a sort of “country noir” and a most unusual movie. Julie London is also very good.

Posted By april : May 15, 2013 4:24 pm

Thank you for giving Mr. Daves some well deserved attention. I agree with the commentator’s praise for “Dark Passage”, which I like at least as much as “To Have and Have Not” and “Key Largo”. “The Hanging Tree” is my favorite of all Daves’ films, and contains one of Gary Cooper’s most interesting performances. After that, I like “Kings Go Forth”. Many fine actors (Bogart, Cooper, Sinatra, Ford—even Sandra Dee in “A Summer Place”) did some of their finest work in a Daves’ productions. The description of Steiger’s style as “perverse artifice” in “Jubal” is delightful!

I also recommend “The Red House”…a sort of “country noir” and a most unusual movie. Julie London is also very good.

Posted By ROY DIXON : May 15, 2013 7:16 pm

THANK YOU FOR GIVING MR. DAVAS THE ATTENTION THAT HE DESERVED AND I HOPE THAT I CAN SEE ALL THE MOVIES THAT HE IS INVOLVED IN.
I AM A WRITTER AND TO SEE THE GREAT WORK THAT HE IS DOING INSPIRES ME TO NO END!!!!

THANKS AGAIN,
ROY R. DIXON

Posted By ROY DIXON : May 15, 2013 7:16 pm

THANK YOU FOR GIVING MR. DAVAS THE ATTENTION THAT HE DESERVED AND I HOPE THAT I CAN SEE ALL THE MOVIES THAT HE IS INVOLVED IN.
I AM A WRITTER AND TO SEE THE GREAT WORK THAT HE IS DOING INSPIRES ME TO NO END!!!!

THANKS AGAIN,
ROY R. DIXON

Posted By The View Beyond Parallax… more reads for week of May 17 | Parallax View : May 17, 2013 1:05 pm

[…] also over at Movie Morlocks, discussing five Delmer Daves films. Nothing wrong at all with his brief appraisals, but the Daves articles you must read are at […]

Posted By The View Beyond Parallax… more reads for week of May 17 | Parallax View : May 17, 2013 1:05 pm

[…] also over at Movie Morlocks, discussing five Delmer Daves films. Nothing wrong at all with his brief appraisals, but the Daves articles you must read are at […]

Posted By Susan Doll : May 17, 2013 1:42 pm

Of course, I know who Delmer Daves was, but I was surprised at how many of the films you listed that I have seen, enjoyed, and remembered. I am going to give him a more thorough look.

Posted By Susan Doll : May 17, 2013 1:42 pm

Of course, I know who Delmer Daves was, but I was surprised at how many of the films you listed that I have seen, enjoyed, and remembered. I am going to give him a more thorough look.

Posted By Juana Maria : May 17, 2013 4:41 pm

I have seen all the films in the pictures! Especially the Westerns! “Jubal” isn’t mentioned much, which to me is sad, because it has Jack Elam and Charles Bronson. They were both in “Vera Cruz” too. Later they’d both be in “Once Upon a Time in the West”. I’ve always liked “Cowboy” with Jack Lemmon and Glenn Ford. I first saw here and only see it here on T.C.M. So thanks a ton for writing this! I have mentioned enough how much I love Westerns?

Posted By Juana Maria : May 17, 2013 4:41 pm

I have seen all the films in the pictures! Especially the Westerns! “Jubal” isn’t mentioned much, which to me is sad, because it has Jack Elam and Charles Bronson. They were both in “Vera Cruz” too. Later they’d both be in “Once Upon a Time in the West”. I’ve always liked “Cowboy” with Jack Lemmon and Glenn Ford. I first saw here and only see it here on T.C.M. So thanks a ton for writing this! I have mentioned enough how much I love Westerns?

Posted By jennifromrollamo : May 17, 2013 4:49 pm

Someone has put The Red House up on Youtube-I watched it via that medium in February. Interesting film and Rory Calhoun-can’t pass up a chance to watch him! I have Pride of the Marines on my dvr-think I’ll view it tonight-thanks for the info on a director I am not that familiar with, though I have seen 3:10 to Yuma and Cowboy, and The Hanging Tree.

Posted By jennifromrollamo : May 17, 2013 4:49 pm

Someone has put The Red House up on Youtube-I watched it via that medium in February. Interesting film and Rory Calhoun-can’t pass up a chance to watch him! I have Pride of the Marines on my dvr-think I’ll view it tonight-thanks for the info on a director I am not that familiar with, though I have seen 3:10 to Yuma and Cowboy, and The Hanging Tree.

Posted By moviemorlocks.com – The Grating American Novel: Youngblood Hawke (1964) : December 17, 2013 3:30 pm

[…] two-part retrospective at Anthology Film Archives. The first was way back in May (of which I gushed here), and the second wraps up today, for which programmers Nick Pinkerton and Nicolas Rapold culled […]

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