Nickelodeon, Director’s Cuts and Peter Bogdanovich

By 1976, Peter Bogdanovich’s breakout movie, The Last Picture Show, had officially become an anomaly.  Its stark drama stood in sharp relief to his next four movies, all comedies.  Bogdanovich seemed to fancy himself a director of screwball comedies and, to a degree, he was right.  What’s Up, Doc? recreated the feel of a screwball comedy very well.  His next effort, Paper Moon, wasn’t screwball so much but may well be, both in terms of construction and box office,  his most successful movie.   After that, Daisy Miller and At Long Last Love didn’t get him any new fans by long shot so by the time Nickelodeon came out in 1976, he was all but washed up (Hollywood moves fast when it comes time to heave you into the ash bin).   It’s not discussed much anymore when people bring up Bogdanovich but in 2009 the director released a director’s cut that put the movie in a whole new light, and “color.”

Nick 02

Most director’s cuts add a few deleted scenes or cut a bit here and a bit there but when Peter Bogdanovich did his director’s cut of Nickelodeon, he truly did something unique:  He took the film from color to black and white.  In the process, he gave the first time viewer a different lens to look through, literally, and the repeat viewer something to ponder.  But does it work?

I’ve seen Nickelodeon three or four times all the way through and in pieces dozens of times.  Back when I was hanging out in the early eighties watching whatever came on cable, it aired more than a few times and I always gave it a look.  I not only liked it for what it was, a ballsy, brash comedy about the early days of film (the very early days, it starts in 1910) but also as a portal into a different world.  I like period films and movies about movies and this was both.  Just watching it made me feel better.

The story concerns lawyer Leo Harrigan (Ryan O’Neal), hapless at his job and bumbling through life, who ends up working as a writer, then director, in the movies.  He meets H. H. Cobb (Brian Keith), a big, loud, demanding producer/mogul who hires him on to go out west and shoot pictures.  Along the way he befriends a young actress, Kathleen Cooke (Jane Hitchcock), and can’t help but fall in love with her.  He also meets Buck Greenway (Burt Reynolds), a delivery boy turned actor who ends up falling for Kathleen and becoming a major movie star.   From there, as the old saying goes, hijinks ensue.

Nick 01

All of the actors are wonderful, from Stella Stevens to John Ritter, and some of them, like George Gaynes, in a very small but rewarding part, are hilarious.  Burt Reynolds is particularly good and he and O’Neal play off of each other extremely well, much better than you’d think.  And the movie never takes its history “lesson” very seriously, even going so far as to show only clips from the first half of Birth of a Nation (under its original title, The Clansmen) during a premiere the characters all attend, presumably because Bogdanovich wanted to keep anything thought-provoking or controversial off the screen lest it detract from the comedy (although earlier in the film there is a kind of sly reference to Birth’s second half when Greenway has to don a sheet and ride a horse onstage before a cheering audience – is this a stage version of the book?).   In fact, every time I’ve seen it, it not only feels like a farce but looks like one, too, bright and colorful.  Recently, I watched the black and white director’s cut.  What a difference monochrome makes.

I wondered how it would be, being so familiar with the movie already.  I was ready to stop and revert to the color version if I wasn’t completely sold in the first five minutes.  I was sold.  What before had seemed so farcical and over the top, now seemed more like the screwball of the thirties.  Still farcical and over the top, yes, but with a somehow weightier feeling.  That is, the desolate look of Paper Moon combined with the feel of What’s Up, Doc? gave the movie an added dimension I’d never seen before.

Bogdanovich had wanted to release it in black and white to begin with, having done so for his other bygone era comedy, Paper Moon.  But despite that movie’s success, the studio said no and demanded it be in color.  And so it was.  The studio made a mistake.  Like Paper Moon, I believe Nickelodeon would have been a hit had it been released the intended way.  The comedy simply works better, the iris-in transitions, the pratfalls, the dialogue – it all seems more fitting in black and white than in color.  The movie is so relentlessly driven (it’s fast-paced and moved along by big plot shifts) that the color feels like gilding the lily.   Black and white brings it a little bit more down to earth.

Nick 03

Of course, I still enjoy it in color as well.  After I watched it, I switched over to the color version on the DVD to watch a few scenes again in color that I remembered fondly from when I originally saw the film.  Once you’ve seen a movie one way, many times, and for so long, it’s tough to adapt to a different way.  When I was a kid, we only had a black and white tv (yes, they used to make those) and many of the color movies I saw on it seemed disappointing to me when I finally saw them in color.  In this case, it’s the reverse, only I didn’t find it disappointing at all.  Maybe there’s something about going from black and white to color that doesn’t feel the same as going from color to black and white.  Maybe black and white just seems classier, as Sam Goldwyn used to say.  Whatever the reason, while I still love the color version, I think I saw a better movie when I watched the black and white version, if that makes any sense at all.  And I think Bogdanovich gave us one of the more challenging director’s cuts out there.  The DVD, released in 2009, contains both the color version and the new monochromatic version.  I recommend giving it a look, first the director’s cut, then the theatrical version.  Afterwards, you can decide which is better.  For me, the answer is easy and Bogdanovich spelled it out for me, right there, in black and white.

66 Responses Nickelodeon, Director’s Cuts and Peter Bogdanovich
Posted By Arthur : April 3, 2013 9:25 am

This brings up a dazzling array of issues. How do completely colorblind individuals see the world? How does seeing a monochrome picture in color and a color picture in monochrome affect its content? How does color vs. black and white affect the mood of the film and the viewer?

Rebel Without A Cause was initially supposed to be shot in black and white, but when they got the go head to shoot in color, the director made a number of modifications. For example, he gave Dean a red jacket to go with his blue jeans and white tea shirt making him an iconic American symbol.

If Bogdanovich wanted it to be shown in black and white, is that the way he shot it, without thought to how the colors would look when seen not in monochrome but in color?

Posted By Arthur : April 3, 2013 9:25 am

This brings up a dazzling array of issues. How do completely colorblind individuals see the world? How does seeing a monochrome picture in color and a color picture in monochrome affect its content? How does color vs. black and white affect the mood of the film and the viewer?

Rebel Without A Cause was initially supposed to be shot in black and white, but when they got the go head to shoot in color, the director made a number of modifications. For example, he gave Dean a red jacket to go with his blue jeans and white tea shirt making him an iconic American symbol.

If Bogdanovich wanted it to be shown in black and white, is that the way he shot it, without thought to how the colors would look when seen not in monochrome but in color?

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 10:27 am

Arthur,

Bogdanovich shot it knowing full well it was in color so everything was thought out to how it would show in color. The order to shoot it in color came before anything was done. But putting it in black and white afterwards was a different story. According to Dave Kehr, for the New York Times:

The director’s version wasn’t created simply by turning down the color knob: it’s the result of substantial work by Mr. Bogdanovich, the cinematographer Laszlo Kovacs (who died in 2007), the colorist John Dunn and Grover Crisp, the executive in charge of maintaining the Sony/Columbia library. Each shot was re-evaluated and retimed for black and white, using both traditional photochemical processes and new digital tools. It’s particularly striking how much more detailed and expressive the interior sequences appear. And as the movie becomes more and more nocturnal, approaching its somber, portentous ending, there is a new sense of emotional darkness devouring both the characters and the image.

So a lot of work went into making it black and white since it had been shot for color.

And black and white or color definitely affect how you view a movie. A very basic example is a color blind person, unable to see red as anything but a shade of grey, watching the girl with the red coat sequence in Schindler’s List. That scene is shot for people to see the color. I’d be interested to know how that scene played for a color blind person.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 10:27 am

Arthur,

Bogdanovich shot it knowing full well it was in color so everything was thought out to how it would show in color. The order to shoot it in color came before anything was done. But putting it in black and white afterwards was a different story. According to Dave Kehr, for the New York Times:

The director’s version wasn’t created simply by turning down the color knob: it’s the result of substantial work by Mr. Bogdanovich, the cinematographer Laszlo Kovacs (who died in 2007), the colorist John Dunn and Grover Crisp, the executive in charge of maintaining the Sony/Columbia library. Each shot was re-evaluated and retimed for black and white, using both traditional photochemical processes and new digital tools. It’s particularly striking how much more detailed and expressive the interior sequences appear. And as the movie becomes more and more nocturnal, approaching its somber, portentous ending, there is a new sense of emotional darkness devouring both the characters and the image.

So a lot of work went into making it black and white since it had been shot for color.

And black and white or color definitely affect how you view a movie. A very basic example is a color blind person, unable to see red as anything but a shade of grey, watching the girl with the red coat sequence in Schindler’s List. That scene is shot for people to see the color. I’d be interested to know how that scene played for a color blind person.

Posted By Arthur : April 3, 2013 10:47 am

This seems the reverse of the colorization process which was largely panned. But in this case the director did it, so I guess it is still his vision. Then would colorizing look good if done by the original director? Could Scorcese colorize Raging Bull?

Posted By Arthur : April 3, 2013 10:47 am

This seems the reverse of the colorization process which was largely panned. But in this case the director did it, so I guess it is still his vision. Then would colorizing look good if done by the original director? Could Scorcese colorize Raging Bull?

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 10:57 am

I’m of the mind that the movie is the director’s in the end. Not everyone agrees with that but if the director wants to change it, he/she should be able to. Not everyone likes a director’s changes but, to use George Lucas as an example, the Star Wars movies are his intellectually, even if he sold the rights by now, and whatever changes he wanted to make, that’s his choice. Disney, on the other hand, even though they own the rights, should leave the original movies and their revamped versions unchanged (except for digital restorations) unless George Lucas, their creator, gives the okay. That’s how I see it anyway.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 10:57 am

I’m of the mind that the movie is the director’s in the end. Not everyone agrees with that but if the director wants to change it, he/she should be able to. Not everyone likes a director’s changes but, to use George Lucas as an example, the Star Wars movies are his intellectually, even if he sold the rights by now, and whatever changes he wanted to make, that’s his choice. Disney, on the other hand, even though they own the rights, should leave the original movies and their revamped versions unchanged (except for digital restorations) unless George Lucas, their creator, gives the okay. That’s how I see it anyway.

Posted By Andrew : April 3, 2013 11:15 am

I can’t articulate the differences between color and BW (beyond the obvious of course) but based on your post, Paper Moon, and The Last Picture Show, maybe Bogdanovich is a BW story teller. Maybe there is something about BW that just aligns better with his vision.

Posted By Andrew : April 3, 2013 11:15 am

I can’t articulate the differences between color and BW (beyond the obvious of course) but based on your post, Paper Moon, and The Last Picture Show, maybe Bogdanovich is a BW story teller. Maybe there is something about BW that just aligns better with his vision.

Posted By swac44 : April 3, 2013 12:19 pm

Makes me wonder how his other homage to golden age Hollywood, The Cat’s Meow would play in black & white. Maybe I’ll revisit it someday, with the colour knob turned down.

Posted By swac44 : April 3, 2013 12:19 pm

Makes me wonder how his other homage to golden age Hollywood, The Cat’s Meow would play in black & white. Maybe I’ll revisit it someday, with the colour knob turned down.

Posted By Bill : April 3, 2013 12:25 pm

Don’t know if it’s because of this movie, but both Reynolds and O’Neal parodied Bogdanovich in later films.

Posted By Bill : April 3, 2013 12:25 pm

Don’t know if it’s because of this movie, but both Reynolds and O’Neal parodied Bogdanovich in later films.

Posted By Arthur : April 3, 2013 12:47 pm

Reynolds and Cybil Shepherd starred in Bogdanovich’s At Long Last Love, a romance set in the ’30s, shot in black and white. It was panned. If the director colorized it, might it improve?

Color vision may take more concentration since it is perceived through the “cones,” located near the center of the retina. Black and white vision uses the “rods,” more on the rim of the retina. Hence, a black and white film may be more relaxing than a color one. And perhaps the director can more easily convey, and the viewer more easily perceive, mood and symbols. (Note how Nickelodeon’s ending, when viewed in black and white, seemed “film noir like.”)

Posted By Arthur : April 3, 2013 12:47 pm

Reynolds and Cybil Shepherd starred in Bogdanovich’s At Long Last Love, a romance set in the ’30s, shot in black and white. It was panned. If the director colorized it, might it improve?

Color vision may take more concentration since it is perceived through the “cones,” located near the center of the retina. Black and white vision uses the “rods,” more on the rim of the retina. Hence, a black and white film may be more relaxing than a color one. And perhaps the director can more easily convey, and the viewer more easily perceive, mood and symbols. (Note how Nickelodeon’s ending, when viewed in black and white, seemed “film noir like.”)

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 2:06 pm

Andrew, he definitely has that feel. The topics he’s drawn to and how he portrays them feel rooted in the golden age of Hollywood more than the post Sixties.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 2:06 pm

Andrew, he definitely has that feel. The topics he’s drawn to and how he portrays them feel rooted in the golden age of Hollywood more than the post Sixties.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 2:08 pm

Swac, on the DVD for The Cat’s Meow, he talks about how he wanted to film it in black and white but, again, couldn’t get backing for that. So what he did instead was use a drab color scheme with a lot of focus on high contrast between blacks and whites. I think he came up with an excellent solution and I don’t think I’d want to see it in black and white now.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 2:08 pm

Swac, on the DVD for The Cat’s Meow, he talks about how he wanted to film it in black and white but, again, couldn’t get backing for that. So what he did instead was use a drab color scheme with a lot of focus on high contrast between blacks and whites. I think he came up with an excellent solution and I don’t think I’d want to see it in black and white now.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 2:09 pm

Bill, O’Neal and Reynolds worked with him more than once so I don’t know when the animosity set in, or if Hooper was more Needham’s view of Bogdanovich and less Reynolds’.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 2:09 pm

Bill, O’Neal and Reynolds worked with him more than once so I don’t know when the animosity set in, or if Hooper was more Needham’s view of Bogdanovich and less Reynolds’.

Posted By Bill : April 3, 2013 2:57 pm

Greg, don’t think Peter B. was on Needham’s radar scree. The portrayal by Robert Kline even quotes Bogdonavich’s book “Pieces of Time”. Did you know he’s making a movie with Cybil, written by ex-wife Polly Platt?

Posted By Bill : April 3, 2013 2:57 pm

Greg, don’t think Peter B. was on Needham’s radar scree. The portrayal by Robert Kline even quotes Bogdonavich’s book “Pieces of Time”. Did you know he’s making a movie with Cybil, written by ex-wife Polly Platt?

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 4:33 pm

Bill, Needham was the stunt coordinator for Nickelodeon and hated how Bogdanovich treated him and his crew.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 3, 2013 4:33 pm

Bill, Needham was the stunt coordinator for Nickelodeon and hated how Bogdanovich treated him and his crew.

Posted By Richard B : April 3, 2013 5:13 pm

Since it wasn’t specified before, the O’Neal character in “Irreconcilable Differences” is clearly modeled on Bogdanovich (which may make Shelley Long and Sharon Stone versions of Polly Platt and Cybill Shepherd, respectively).

When I was a kid the local TV station showed black-and-white prints of Hammer’s horror films; I was surprised to learn later that they were in color. As Gothic horrors, they naturally worked perfectly in b&w. I wonder if the TV prints were struck in b&w to tone down the bloodiness.

Posted By Richard B : April 3, 2013 5:13 pm

Since it wasn’t specified before, the O’Neal character in “Irreconcilable Differences” is clearly modeled on Bogdanovich (which may make Shelley Long and Sharon Stone versions of Polly Platt and Cybill Shepherd, respectively).

When I was a kid the local TV station showed black-and-white prints of Hammer’s horror films; I was surprised to learn later that they were in color. As Gothic horrors, they naturally worked perfectly in b&w. I wonder if the TV prints were struck in b&w to tone down the bloodiness.

Posted By Bill : April 3, 2013 6:05 pm

Greg, didn’t make the Needham connection to Nicklelodeon. No wonder there was so much joy at Peter’s downfall.

Posted By Bill : April 3, 2013 6:05 pm

Greg, didn’t make the Needham connection to Nicklelodeon. No wonder there was so much joy at Peter’s downfall.

Posted By Susan Doll : April 3, 2013 8:44 pm

I just bought Nickelodeon from Amazon, along with several other films. I thought it might come in handy in my film class some day. I did not realize that it has the b&w version. I am so happy that you did this post. I am going to watch it soon. Bogdanovich is coming to the Sarasota Film Fest to do an onstage interview and in support of some indie film he is in. I am going to try to snag a ticket to see him.

Posted By Susan Doll : April 3, 2013 8:44 pm

I just bought Nickelodeon from Amazon, along with several other films. I thought it might come in handy in my film class some day. I did not realize that it has the b&w version. I am so happy that you did this post. I am going to watch it soon. Bogdanovich is coming to the Sarasota Film Fest to do an onstage interview and in support of some indie film he is in. I am going to try to snag a ticket to see him.

Posted By Doug : April 4, 2013 3:15 am

There are some totally biased insights about Bogdanovitch in Cybill Shepherd’s book, “Cybill Disobedience”. A good read.
Just as I am thankful to Rob Reiner for “The Princess Bride”, so I appreciate Bogdanovitch for giving us “What’s Up, Doc?”.
They’ve both made other good movies, but those two films are tops.

Posted By Doug : April 4, 2013 3:15 am

There are some totally biased insights about Bogdanovitch in Cybill Shepherd’s book, “Cybill Disobedience”. A good read.
Just as I am thankful to Rob Reiner for “The Princess Bride”, so I appreciate Bogdanovitch for giving us “What’s Up, Doc?”.
They’ve both made other good movies, but those two films are tops.

Posted By Bill : April 4, 2013 5:02 am

If I remember right,Bogdanovich’s contract specifically forbade him from hiring Cybill on Nicklelodeon.

Posted By Bill : April 4, 2013 5:02 am

If I remember right,Bogdanovich’s contract specifically forbade him from hiring Cybill on Nicklelodeon.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 4, 2013 8:55 am

Susan, I’d be interested to know what you think of the black and white version. Since I grew up seeing it in color, I’ll probably always be more comfortable seeing it that way but I completely understand and agree with PB’s motivation for doing it in B & W. It grounds the movie in a way the color doesn’t.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 4, 2013 8:55 am

Susan, I’d be interested to know what you think of the black and white version. Since I grew up seeing it in color, I’ll probably always be more comfortable seeing it that way but I completely understand and agree with PB’s motivation for doing it in B & W. It grounds the movie in a way the color doesn’t.

Posted By Emgee : April 4, 2013 9:39 am

“by the time Nickelodeon came out in 1976, he was all but washed up”

To be fair, that was partly due to his own apparently pretty unbearably arrogant behaviour. The succes of his early films really went to his head and he fancied himself as the saviour of Hollywood.
So the knives were already sharpened to stab him in the back after his first failure. That Nickelodeon is a good movie hardly mattered.

Posted By Emgee : April 4, 2013 9:39 am

“by the time Nickelodeon came out in 1976, he was all but washed up”

To be fair, that was partly due to his own apparently pretty unbearably arrogant behaviour. The succes of his early films really went to his head and he fancied himself as the saviour of Hollywood.
So the knives were already sharpened to stab him in the back after his first failure. That Nickelodeon is a good movie hardly mattered.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 4, 2013 10:05 am

And I was probably being a bit hyperbolic there. I mean, he wasn’t washed up so much as not the big man in town anymore. The next film he made that achieved both critical and commercial success was MASK in 1985.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 4, 2013 10:05 am

And I was probably being a bit hyperbolic there. I mean, he wasn’t washed up so much as not the big man in town anymore. The next film he made that achieved both critical and commercial success was MASK in 1985.

Posted By Jeffrey Ford : April 4, 2013 10:42 am

Arthur doesn’t know what he’s talking about. AT LONG LAST LOVE was shot and released in color, so colorizing it is out of the question. With color or without, it was a lousy film. I’ll have to take another look at NICKELODEON (which I haven’t seen in years) but B&W or color, it’s considerably better.

Posted By Jeffrey Ford : April 4, 2013 10:42 am

Arthur doesn’t know what he’s talking about. AT LONG LAST LOVE was shot and released in color, so colorizing it is out of the question. With color or without, it was a lousy film. I’ll have to take another look at NICKELODEON (which I haven’t seen in years) but B&W or color, it’s considerably better.

Posted By robbushblog : April 4, 2013 1:32 pm

I need to see this movie.

Posted By robbushblog : April 4, 2013 1:32 pm

I need to see this movie.

Posted By Doug : April 4, 2013 2:09 pm

Trust me, robbushblog-you don’t. We shouldn’t be too hard on Arthur about “At Long Last Love”-the color scheme was washed out, almost looking black and white.
The biggest problem with the production was the self aware “Look! We’re doing an old time musical! Aren’t we clever?” tone set by Peter B. The performers weren’t emoting, they were playing performers who were supposed to be emoting as they sang, and that emotional disconnect killed the picture.

Posted By Doug : April 4, 2013 2:09 pm

Trust me, robbushblog-you don’t. We shouldn’t be too hard on Arthur about “At Long Last Love”-the color scheme was washed out, almost looking black and white.
The biggest problem with the production was the self aware “Look! We’re doing an old time musical! Aren’t we clever?” tone set by Peter B. The performers weren’t emoting, they were playing performers who were supposed to be emoting as they sang, and that emotional disconnect killed the picture.

Posted By Arthur : April 4, 2013 3:33 pm

Jeffrey, you are right. Arthur doesn’t know what he was talking about. And thanks, Doug. “At Long Last Lovee” must have been pretty washed out and I haven’t seen it since its release. So my faded memory of it may have somehow turned it into Black and white.

But speaking of faded colors, in the old days films were either black and white or brilliant technicolor. Today both are gone and most movies have colors that are washed out to varying degrees.

Posted By Arthur : April 4, 2013 3:33 pm

Jeffrey, you are right. Arthur doesn’t know what he was talking about. And thanks, Doug. “At Long Last Lovee” must have been pretty washed out and I haven’t seen it since its release. So my faded memory of it may have somehow turned it into Black and white.

But speaking of faded colors, in the old days films were either black and white or brilliant technicolor. Today both are gone and most movies have colors that are washed out to varying degrees.

Posted By robbushblog : April 4, 2013 3:42 pm

So I take it you don’t like the movie, Doug?

Posted By robbushblog : April 4, 2013 3:42 pm

So I take it you don’t like the movie, Doug?

Posted By Pat Turman : April 4, 2013 10:39 pm

Greg,
Ever read any of Bogdanovich’s books? I’m sure you know he was a movie critic before he was a director. And he interviewed some great directors & actors of the Golden Age of Hollywood (his WHO THE DEVIL MADE IT & WHO THE HELL’S IN IT are great, great reads for anybody who’s a fan of old movies). Sure, he was guilty of some bad behavior in the drugged out 70′s (who wasn’t?) but I’m a fan of his regardless because he’s very knowledgeable (young directors could learn a lot from him) & his love of movies always came through. I haven’t seen NICKELODEAN (heard about, seen bits of it) but you’ve whetted my appetite, Greg. I’ll have to buy it. Look forward to seeing it in B & W.

Posted By Pat Turman : April 4, 2013 10:39 pm

Greg,
Ever read any of Bogdanovich’s books? I’m sure you know he was a movie critic before he was a director. And he interviewed some great directors & actors of the Golden Age of Hollywood (his WHO THE DEVIL MADE IT & WHO THE HELL’S IN IT are great, great reads for anybody who’s a fan of old movies). Sure, he was guilty of some bad behavior in the drugged out 70′s (who wasn’t?) but I’m a fan of his regardless because he’s very knowledgeable (young directors could learn a lot from him) & his love of movies always came through. I haven’t seen NICKELODEAN (heard about, seen bits of it) but you’ve whetted my appetite, Greg. I’ll have to buy it. Look forward to seeing it in B & W.

Posted By Doug : April 5, 2013 2:15 am

I gave up about 20 minutes in, after Madeline Kahn sang her way through her apartment. Too cute, too self aware-I knew I wasn’t watching another “What’s Up, Doc?”. I gave it a try after reading about it in Shepherd’s book. I like all of the major cast, but just couldn’t get into it.

Posted By Doug : April 5, 2013 2:15 am

I gave up about 20 minutes in, after Madeline Kahn sang her way through her apartment. Too cute, too self aware-I knew I wasn’t watching another “What’s Up, Doc?”. I gave it a try after reading about it in Shepherd’s book. I like all of the major cast, but just couldn’t get into it.

Posted By Richard B : April 5, 2013 2:19 pm

One book of his that I’ve held onto for decades is his interview with Allan Dwan, “The Last Pioneer.”

Saw “Nickelodeon” in its theatrical first (and likely last) run and loved it.

Posted By Richard B : April 5, 2013 2:19 pm

One book of his that I’ve held onto for decades is his interview with Allan Dwan, “The Last Pioneer.”

Saw “Nickelodeon” in its theatrical first (and likely last) run and loved it.

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 5, 2013 5:47 pm

Doug, I think (though I may be wrong) that Rob is talking about Nickelodeon, not At Long Last Love, that he needs to see. And I’d recommend it (Nickelodeon, that is).

Posted By Greg Ferrara : April 5, 2013 5:47 pm

Doug, I think (though I may be wrong) that Rob is talking about Nickelodeon, not At Long Last Love, that he needs to see. And I’d recommend it (Nickelodeon, that is).

Posted By robbushblog : April 5, 2013 7:24 pm

At Long Last Love sounds terrible.

Posted By robbushblog : April 5, 2013 7:24 pm

At Long Last Love sounds terrible.

Posted By Doug : April 6, 2013 2:45 am

Thanks for the clarification, Greg-I will be looking for Nickleodeon, and would like to see it first in B/W.
I see that it came out in 1976-as a dumb kid,it would have gone right over my head, but as a wiser (?) adult, I think I would appreciate it.

Posted By Doug : April 6, 2013 2:45 am

Thanks for the clarification, Greg-I will be looking for Nickleodeon, and would like to see it first in B/W.
I see that it came out in 1976-as a dumb kid,it would have gone right over my head, but as a wiser (?) adult, I think I would appreciate it.

Posted By Jennifer : April 10, 2013 12:45 pm

I first saw Nickelodeon when I was 8. I have always liked it better than Paper Moon and I really wish it had been in black and white to begin with. There’s a certain mild nausea that most movies of the 70′s inspire in me, whether I like the movie or not, and I have yet to accurately describe or explain, or even understand, the reasons why. It’s partly the music, partly the look of the actors, partly the film quality and lighting and, and partly the color. Black and white would clear up most of this for me. I will have to seek it out.

Posted By Jennifer : April 10, 2013 12:45 pm

I first saw Nickelodeon when I was 8. I have always liked it better than Paper Moon and I really wish it had been in black and white to begin with. There’s a certain mild nausea that most movies of the 70′s inspire in me, whether I like the movie or not, and I have yet to accurately describe or explain, or even understand, the reasons why. It’s partly the music, partly the look of the actors, partly the film quality and lighting and, and partly the color. Black and white would clear up most of this for me. I will have to seek it out.

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Streamline is the official blog of FilmStruck, a new subscription service that offers film aficionados a comprehensive library of films including an eclectic mix of contemporary and classic art house, indie, foreign and cult films.