James Mason the Dark, Young God

James Mason is most often remembered for his voice—described variously as distinctive, melodious, mellifluous, even honeyed. It is an attribute that served him well in his trademark roles as ill-fated losers Norman Maine, Ed Avery, and Humbert Humbert in the landmark Hollywood films A Star Is Born, Bigger than Life, and Lolita or as the suave, urbane antagonist Philip Vandamm in North by Northwest. The contradiction between that smooth, cultured voice and the callous, corrupted, or criminal nature of his characters made for compelling performances.

That was the James Mason whom I had discovered a long time ago. As a respected Hollywood actor, he had found a niche—one that allowed for a range of colorful characters that were seldom sympathetic and rarely romantic. While I admired his acting talent, I never thought of him as leading man material because I never found him physically appealing—until I saw The Reckless Moment, a 1949 crime melodrama directed by Max Ophuls. As Irish rogue Martin Donnelly, Mason plays a petty criminal who falls in love with the married woman he is trying to blackmail.  Handsome, dashing, and moody, Martin Donnelly is the menacing but sensitive bad boy that most women can’t resist. Unlike Joan Bennett, who costars as the married woman who remains faithful to her absent husband, I would have run off with Martin Donnelly in a heartbeat—despite the high price that inevitably comes with choosing the bad boy. (The Reckless Moment airs on TCM on July 15. I highly recommend this little gem of a melodrama.)

MASON AS STREETER IN ‘THUNDER ROCK’

Recently, I watched Thunder Rock, a WW II drama featuring Mason in a secondary role. Released in 1942, the film stars Michael Redgrave as a disillusioned journalist working as a lighthouse keeper on a remote island. Mason, who was still playing supporting roles at this stage of his career, costars as Redgrave’s pal. The voice was instantly recognizable as Mason’s, but instead of the urbane sophisticate, he played a dashing young airplane pilot who has just volunteered to fly for the Chinese against the Japanese.  The character was romantic, admirable, heroic, and a bit melancholy—not at all like Norman Maine, Ed Avery, Humbert Humbert, or Philip Vandamm.

Charmed by the young, physically attractive James Mason of Thunder Rock and The Reckless Moment, I checked into his early life and career to discover a leading man with an intriguing star image as well as a restless soul prone to unhappiness and trouble.

MASON CHARMS MARGARET LOCKWOOD IN HIS STAR-MAKING ROLE IN ‘THE MAN IN GREY’

Mason became a star in the British film industry in 1943 when he was cast in the romantic melodrama The Man in Grey, in which he played a ruthless but irresistible aristocrat. Actually, Mason’s Lord Rohan was more than a star-making role; it created a sensation. The Man in Grey became the first in a series of “quota quickie” melodramas from Gainsborough Pictures starring Mason. A quota quickie was a low-budget movie with a short shooting schedule, which was produced to satisfy the British government’s ruling that a percentage of films shown in the United Kingdom had to be made in Britain. The Man in Grey created an unusual leading-man star image for Mason as the handsome but misogynistic, saturnine villain whose cruel manner did not prevent women from falling for his charms (blame the voice). After The Man in Grey, Mason starred in Fanny by Gaslight (1944), in which he persecuted Phyllis Calvert, The Wicked Lady (1945), in which he played a highway robber, and They Were Sisters (1945), about a bullying husband who drives his wife to suicide. This character type reached a high point of sadism in The Seventh Veil (1945), starring Ann Todd as a pianist and Mason as her unkind guardian. In the film’s most famous scene, Mason slams a walking stick across Todd’s fingers as she plays the piano. Their intense onscreen relationship was fueled by an ultra-passionate off-screen affair.

MASON AND MARGARET LOCKWOOD RETEAM FOR ‘THE WICKED LADY.’

One biographer described Mason’s star image from the Gainsborough melodramas as sadism with an erotic undertone. Director Michael Powel referred to him as “the dark, young god” of British cinema. Not only was I surprised to discover that Mason was an irresistible heartthrob, but I was fascinated  by the popularity of his combination of cruelty and sexuality, which was obviously aimed at female movie-goers. I can’t see this sort of star image being cultivated in Hollywood, where the Production Code Administration frowned upon romantic leading men taking on dark, unheroic roles. Even the hard-boiled, tough-talking private detectives of postwar film noir were still saps for women.

Mason was not one of those British actors who felt that appearing in films was slumming. He believed that a great film was comparable in artistry to a great play. He was particularly proud of his performance as the wounded gunman who is relentlessly pursued in Carol Reed’s Odd Man Out (1947), a diversion from the Gainsborough melodramas. By that time, Mason had grown weary of the Gainsborough films, which were repetitive and uncreative. Mason grumbled that he was being suffocated in the British film industry, complaining that it was insular and claustrophobic. He left for Hollywood in the late 1940s and did not look back.

In America, Max Ophuls cast him as the leading man in his crime melodramas Caught (1949) and The Reckless Moment, in which vestiges of his star image still lingered. However, Mason had come to Hollywood to experience diverse roles, and he was eager to leave behind his image as “the dark, young god.” He found a new niche in Hollywood as the urbane sophisticate with the dulcet tones, yet it was a character type that offered more opportunities. Whether the villain, the trouble protagonist, or unlikable cad, Mason’s voice was his greatest asset: It was perfect for lobbing the lingering insult or innuendo; it could offer an impassioned speech with burning conviction; or, it could seem soothing, almost languid in conversation.

ILLUSTRATION FROM ‘THE CATS IN OUR LIVES’

In England, Mason had led a troubled, controversial personal life. The son of a textile merchant, he studied architecture before turning to acting. He joined the Old Vic and then the Gate Theater in Dublin, before appearing in his first movie in 1935. During the war, Mason was a conscientious objector, which was not a popular stance during WWII. The decision alienated Mason from his father, but his occupation as a film actor was considered a worthy substitute for soldier given the British film industry’s role in producing propaganda for the war effort.

While no one in the industry criticized his status as a conscientious objector, he was not particularly well liked by his costars or directors for other reasons. He was known to condemn the directors and producers of Gainsborough “for polluting artistic aspirations.” He drank heavily during the shooting of The Seventh Veil and performed his role in They Were Sisters with a perpetual hangover. During the production of The Night Has Eyes, he punched director Leslie Arliss in the face, because Arliss tended to call Mason to the set early in the afternoons but kept him waiting for hours before shooting his scenes. Though Mason could be difficult to work with, the British film industry did not take kindly to losing one of its biggest stars. Soon after his departure from England, Picturegoer magazine noted, “Certainly, James does not seem to be advancing his career in Hollywood.”

ANOTHER ILLUSTRATION BY MASON FROM ‘THE CATS IN OUR LIVES’

According to some sources, Mason was not content in America and was openly contemptuous of California in general and Hollywood in particular. Part of his misery was undoubtedly due to his unhappy marriage to former journalist Pamela Mason, whom he wed in 1941 but did not divorce till 1964.Their open feud played out on TV talk and game shows during the 1960s in which Pamela would rant about her bad marriage, declaring “James was so dull” to television audiences.

But just like his career is the tale of two James Masons, so is his personal life more complex than the ugly stories about bad behavior and a bad marriage. In addition to his talents as an actor, he was a poet and a skilled cartoonist. My favorite fact about Mason is that he was an avid cat lover. When he and Pamela first arrived in the US with their dog and five cats, he was unable to work for about a year because of a legal entanglement regarding a contract. In the interim, he and Pamela wrote a book, published in 1949, titled The Cats in Our Lives, with Mason providing all of the illustrations. In 1956, they released a second book called Favorite Cat Stories of Pamela and James Mason. Biographers of the actor speculate on why the Masons stayed together so long if they were so unhappy. I like to think it was because of the cats.

44 Responses James Mason the Dark, Young God
Posted By Arthur : June 4, 2012 1:08 pm

Thanks. I never knew how Mason got his start. And I was unaware of these early films. My favorite Mason film is Pandora And the Flying Dutchman. . .

Posted By Arthur : June 4, 2012 1:08 pm

Thanks. I never knew how Mason got his start. And I was unaware of these early films. My favorite Mason film is Pandora And the Flying Dutchman. . .

Posted By dukeroberts : June 4, 2012 1:28 pm

My favorite Mason part was Captain Nemo in Disney’s great 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

Are the cat books still in print?

Posted By dukeroberts : June 4, 2012 1:28 pm

My favorite Mason part was Captain Nemo in Disney’s great 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

Are the cat books still in print?

Posted By Kingrat : June 4, 2012 2:03 pm

Thanks for an informative piece about one of my favorite actors. TCM has shown THE WICKED LADY, and maybe you’ll encourage them to bring us THE MAN IN GREY (which I’ve seen on an old VHS tape) and FANNY BY GASLIGHT. THE SEVENTH VEIL is coming up in the next few months.

Like Arthur, my favorite Mason role is the Flying Dutchman. TCM has shown this beautiful film with some regularity.

Posted By Kingrat : June 4, 2012 2:03 pm

Thanks for an informative piece about one of my favorite actors. TCM has shown THE WICKED LADY, and maybe you’ll encourage them to bring us THE MAN IN GREY (which I’ve seen on an old VHS tape) and FANNY BY GASLIGHT. THE SEVENTH VEIL is coming up in the next few months.

Like Arthur, my favorite Mason role is the Flying Dutchman. TCM has shown this beautiful film with some regularity.

Posted By swac44 : June 4, 2012 2:57 pm

Caught and The Seventh Veil are terrific movies, I saw them years ago on VHS (the former also has Robert Ryan as a hissable bad guy, and a lovely, young Barbara Bel Geddes…who I would have picked over nutbar Kim Novak in Vertigo myself). Thanks for the heads up about The Reckless Moment!

Posted By swac44 : June 4, 2012 2:57 pm

Caught and The Seventh Veil are terrific movies, I saw them years ago on VHS (the former also has Robert Ryan as a hissable bad guy, and a lovely, young Barbara Bel Geddes…who I would have picked over nutbar Kim Novak in Vertigo myself). Thanks for the heads up about The Reckless Moment!

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : June 4, 2012 3:02 pm

I sat with Pamela and Portland (their daughter) Mason one evening at a book convention in Santa Barbara in 1978-79. Somebody came by the table and asked Pamela, “What is James doing these days?” Her answer: “Louse Fletcher, mostly.”

Posted By John Maddox Roberts : June 4, 2012 3:02 pm

I sat with Pamela and Portland (their daughter) Mason one evening at a book convention in Santa Barbara in 1978-79. Somebody came by the table and asked Pamela, “What is James doing these days?” Her answer: “Louse Fletcher, mostly.”

Posted By Susan Doll : June 4, 2012 3:10 pm

My new favorite James Mason movie is THUNDER BAY, though he is only in it for one sequence. It is really Michael Redgrave’s movie, but I liked the dead-counsel-the-living storyline a lot. TCM is showing this one in August. Other than that, I have to go with THE RECKLESS MOMENT.

Dukeroberts: The cat books are not in print. One of them is something of a collectors’ item and goes for over $300 on Amazon. Even for non-cat lovers, Mason’s fluid drawing style gives his work energy and expression. I think they are very good.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 4, 2012 3:10 pm

My new favorite James Mason movie is THUNDER BAY, though he is only in it for one sequence. It is really Michael Redgrave’s movie, but I liked the dead-counsel-the-living storyline a lot. TCM is showing this one in August. Other than that, I have to go with THE RECKLESS MOMENT.

Dukeroberts: The cat books are not in print. One of them is something of a collectors’ item and goes for over $300 on Amazon. Even for non-cat lovers, Mason’s fluid drawing style gives his work energy and expression. I think they are very good.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 4, 2012 4:29 pm

Hey, I just learned that it is “Hug Your Cat Day.” No kidding! How appropriate to post Mason’s cat drawings on this day.

Posted By Susan Doll : June 4, 2012 4:29 pm

Hey, I just learned that it is “Hug Your Cat Day.” No kidding! How appropriate to post Mason’s cat drawings on this day.

Posted By michaelgloversmith : June 4, 2012 4:31 pm

Great overview of Mason’s career.The scene in The Reckless Moment where he buys a cigarette filter for Joan Bennett, which indicates his growing feelings for her, is absolutely exquisite. My favorite Mason performance (and film) though is Nick Ray’s Bigger Than Life.

Posted By michaelgloversmith : June 4, 2012 4:31 pm

Great overview of Mason’s career.The scene in The Reckless Moment where he buys a cigarette filter for Joan Bennett, which indicates his growing feelings for her, is absolutely exquisite. My favorite Mason performance (and film) though is Nick Ray’s Bigger Than Life.

Posted By Medusa : June 4, 2012 4:35 pm

Great post!

I haven’t seen his more dashing roles, but I will watch out for them now! I love his sad and bittersweet performance in “A Star is Born” (a perfect complement to Garland’s) and also his nasty but also melancholy Humbert in “Lolita”. He always seemed to have sort of a frog-face to me, but what a talent and clearly charismatic.

And a cat lover, to boot! Gotta love him extra for that!

(For a treat, look up Jon Hamm playing James Mason — the first time was the funniest — in two SNL Halloween skits; he was hilarious!)

Posted By Medusa : June 4, 2012 4:35 pm

Great post!

I haven’t seen his more dashing roles, but I will watch out for them now! I love his sad and bittersweet performance in “A Star is Born” (a perfect complement to Garland’s) and also his nasty but also melancholy Humbert in “Lolita”. He always seemed to have sort of a frog-face to me, but what a talent and clearly charismatic.

And a cat lover, to boot! Gotta love him extra for that!

(For a treat, look up Jon Hamm playing James Mason — the first time was the funniest — in two SNL Halloween skits; he was hilarious!)

Posted By moirafinnie : June 4, 2012 4:38 pm

Great post, Susan~ I have just revisited Mason’s early Gainsborough films and other films of that period recently. In reading some interviews with his frequent co-star Margaret Lockwood, the actress remembered Mason with great affection, recalling a film society fete in the ’70s when both were honored for their early work in such films as The Wicked Lady (1945).

Lockwood, who sounds as though she had a realistic perspective on her career at all times, scoffed when Mason rambled a bit, remembering their teamwork as more artistically satisfying than she recalled it. Despite her feeling that the films were rather silly (though I think a case could be made that they were expressions of their female audiences’ deepest feelings and frustrations), his respect for the work and affection for his often mysterious characters still comes through on screen as most convincing.

Posted By moirafinnie : June 4, 2012 4:38 pm

Great post, Susan~ I have just revisited Mason’s early Gainsborough films and other films of that period recently. In reading some interviews with his frequent co-star Margaret Lockwood, the actress remembered Mason with great affection, recalling a film society fete in the ’70s when both were honored for their early work in such films as The Wicked Lady (1945).

Lockwood, who sounds as though she had a realistic perspective on her career at all times, scoffed when Mason rambled a bit, remembering their teamwork as more artistically satisfying than she recalled it. Despite her feeling that the films were rather silly (though I think a case could be made that they were expressions of their female audiences’ deepest feelings and frustrations), his respect for the work and affection for his often mysterious characters still comes through on screen as most convincing.

Posted By AL : June 4, 2012 5:02 pm

One of the great actors. So many truly great films! I love THE NIGHT HAS EYES… During the “one-night-only” U.S.tour of the restored A STAR IS BORN–he appeared on stage with Lillian Gish, Fay Kanin, and Ronald Haver. You betcha I was there…I was fortunate enough to have seen the original first-run STAR before it was forever mutilated by Nobody’sFavorite Jack Warner (he even melted down the original negatives to retrieve the silver nitrate–didn’t even save ONE complete print for the WB vault!– A true Barbarian.)(The first thing Haver found in that vault was the complete original stereo soundtrack–uncut.That’s what he used to begin the years-long restoration process.)
Anywayz: I’m grateful that I saw the original SEVEN times!

Posted By AL : June 4, 2012 5:02 pm

One of the great actors. So many truly great films! I love THE NIGHT HAS EYES… During the “one-night-only” U.S.tour of the restored A STAR IS BORN–he appeared on stage with Lillian Gish, Fay Kanin, and Ronald Haver. You betcha I was there…I was fortunate enough to have seen the original first-run STAR before it was forever mutilated by Nobody’sFavorite Jack Warner (he even melted down the original negatives to retrieve the silver nitrate–didn’t even save ONE complete print for the WB vault!– A true Barbarian.)(The first thing Haver found in that vault was the complete original stereo soundtrack–uncut.That’s what he used to begin the years-long restoration process.)
Anywayz: I’m grateful that I saw the original SEVEN times!

Posted By Muriel : June 4, 2012 7:18 pm

Ahhh, James Mason is always a pleasure to watch. I don’t know about his “attraction” as those Gainsborough erotic cads, but he is definitely entertaining. “East Side, West Side” is another one of his erotic charming cad roles. Barbara Stanwyck is his wife and Ava Gardner the bitchy seductress whom he resists ever so weakly. Gales Sondergaard as his mother in law! Van Heflin as the sypathetic nice guy! Great melodrama.
I also like him as Brutus in “Julius Ceasar”. Speaking of melliflous voices, Mason and Gielgud together in Julius Caesar is an aural pleasure. :-)

Posted By Muriel : June 4, 2012 7:18 pm

Ahhh, James Mason is always a pleasure to watch. I don’t know about his “attraction” as those Gainsborough erotic cads, but he is definitely entertaining. “East Side, West Side” is another one of his erotic charming cad roles. Barbara Stanwyck is his wife and Ava Gardner the bitchy seductress whom he resists ever so weakly. Gales Sondergaard as his mother in law! Van Heflin as the sypathetic nice guy! Great melodrama.
I also like him as Brutus in “Julius Ceasar”. Speaking of melliflous voices, Mason and Gielgud together in Julius Caesar is an aural pleasure. :-)

Posted By Vintage Living Magazine : June 4, 2012 8:05 pm

Thank you for the excellent exposé on James Mason…one of old Hollywood’s best! :-)

Posted By Vintage Living Magazine : June 4, 2012 8:05 pm

Thank you for the excellent exposé on James Mason…one of old Hollywood’s best! :-)

Posted By kimalysong : June 4, 2012 9:06 pm

I love James Mason. The first thing I watched him in was NBNW and I thought he was fantastic. However I think what really made me a “fan” were his performances in [The Odd Man Out and The Man Between two great films that I discovered on TCM.

I also was really happy that TCM finally showed Caught & the Reckless Moment recently. While I wouldn’t call either a favorite, they were great to see.

I also read the Cats in Our Lives. It was an interesting book and in some ways I felt I learned more about Mason in this book then I would from a typical autobiography.

Posted By kimalysong : June 4, 2012 9:06 pm

I love James Mason. The first thing I watched him in was NBNW and I thought he was fantastic. However I think what really made me a “fan” were his performances in [The Odd Man Out and The Man Between two great films that I discovered on TCM.

I also was really happy that TCM finally showed Caught & the Reckless Moment recently. While I wouldn’t call either a favorite, they were great to see.

I also read the Cats in Our Lives. It was an interesting book and in some ways I felt I learned more about Mason in this book then I would from a typical autobiography.

Posted By Grand Old Movies : June 4, 2012 11:45 pm

Mason and his wife Pamela did make at least one movie together, a late-40s British film called “The Upturned Glass.” Mason plays a doctor who murders a woman who’s responsible for the death of another woman he was in love with. The murder victim was played by Pamela – now after reading your piece, I wonder if the animosity expressed in that film between their two characters was only acting…

Posted By Grand Old Movies : June 4, 2012 11:45 pm

Mason and his wife Pamela did make at least one movie together, a late-40s British film called “The Upturned Glass.” Mason plays a doctor who murders a woman who’s responsible for the death of another woman he was in love with. The murder victim was played by Pamela – now after reading your piece, I wonder if the animosity expressed in that film between their two characters was only acting…

Posted By Susan Doll : June 4, 2012 11:57 pm

Such interesting comments and recollections from my readers!

Kimalysong: I read other comments about Mason’s cat books similar to yours in that they were more revealing of his personality than his biographies.

Grand Old Movies: I have not seen THE UPTURNED GLASS but I read about it while I was researching this post. Apparently, Mason and his wife had a contentious relationship almost from the beginning, so perhaps their appearance together was less acting and more cathartic release!

Posted By Susan Doll : June 4, 2012 11:57 pm

Such interesting comments and recollections from my readers!

Kimalysong: I read other comments about Mason’s cat books similar to yours in that they were more revealing of his personality than his biographies.

Grand Old Movies: I have not seen THE UPTURNED GLASS but I read about it while I was researching this post. Apparently, Mason and his wife had a contentious relationship almost from the beginning, so perhaps their appearance together was less acting and more cathartic release!

Posted By Jenni : June 5, 2012 12:10 pm

Loved James Mason more in his earlier work than his later turns in films. I saw the Wicked Lady this spring via You Tube and loved it. In my readings about the film, it was sort of looked down on by Gainsborough, for some reason they didn’t think it would do well and it ended up being the biggest box office winner in Great Britain for 1945. WWII was raging, people wanted escapism. The film also parallels Gone With the Wind. The Wicked Lady, Margaret Lockwood’s character, would give Scarlet O’Hara a run for her money as a willful, spoilt woman, scheming to get her way at all costs. Mason’s highwayman is similar to Rhett Butler, the kind cousin of Lockwood’s,Caroline, played by Patricia Roc, is very similar to Melanie Wilkes, and Lockwood thinks she is desperately in love with cousin Caroline’s fiance, Sir Skelton, played by Griffith Jones, and he calls up Ashley Wilkes! There is no Mammy in Wicked Lady, but one servant, Hogarth, played by Felix Aaylmer, is wise and discovers the truth of Lockwood’s schemes. Thanks for the extra info on Mason’s books about cats. I am planning on searching for them at our local library, and one of my daughter’s loves cats too. Perhaps we’ll read the books together.

Posted By Jenni : June 5, 2012 12:10 pm

Loved James Mason more in his earlier work than his later turns in films. I saw the Wicked Lady this spring via You Tube and loved it. In my readings about the film, it was sort of looked down on by Gainsborough, for some reason they didn’t think it would do well and it ended up being the biggest box office winner in Great Britain for 1945. WWII was raging, people wanted escapism. The film also parallels Gone With the Wind. The Wicked Lady, Margaret Lockwood’s character, would give Scarlet O’Hara a run for her money as a willful, spoilt woman, scheming to get her way at all costs. Mason’s highwayman is similar to Rhett Butler, the kind cousin of Lockwood’s,Caroline, played by Patricia Roc, is very similar to Melanie Wilkes, and Lockwood thinks she is desperately in love with cousin Caroline’s fiance, Sir Skelton, played by Griffith Jones, and he calls up Ashley Wilkes! There is no Mammy in Wicked Lady, but one servant, Hogarth, played by Felix Aaylmer, is wise and discovers the truth of Lockwood’s schemes. Thanks for the extra info on Mason’s books about cats. I am planning on searching for them at our local library, and one of my daughter’s loves cats too. Perhaps we’ll read the books together.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 5, 2012 2:50 pm

Like many, I love Mason (I’m particularly fond of his later roles – think he did marvelous stuff in the ’60s!). I’m not sure many Americans realize that he’s a HUGE film star in the UK and has influenced countless performers there in ways that Brando or Dean have here in the US.

Didn’t know about his cat fascination and the book. Great stuff!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : June 5, 2012 2:50 pm

Like many, I love Mason (I’m particularly fond of his later roles – think he did marvelous stuff in the ’60s!). I’m not sure many Americans realize that he’s a HUGE film star in the UK and has influenced countless performers there in ways that Brando or Dean have here in the US.

Didn’t know about his cat fascination and the book. Great stuff!

Posted By tdraicer : June 5, 2012 10:12 pm

Another big Mason fan (and cat lover). He did excellent work throughout his career (including his next to last film, The Shooting Party) but I always think of him first as Rommel in The Desert Fox and The Desert Rats.

Posted By tdraicer : June 5, 2012 10:12 pm

Another big Mason fan (and cat lover). He did excellent work throughout his career (including his next to last film, The Shooting Party) but I always think of him first as Rommel in The Desert Fox and The Desert Rats.

Posted By Juana Maria : June 7, 2012 7:37 pm

Susan Doll: I have 4 cats,and I love them so much! I never heard of Hug Your Cat Day before! Wow! I don’t really need a special day to hug my kitties! They follow me around and not just when they are hungry. I never knew very much about James Mason’s personal life before your article. He was nice looking when he was younger and quite an underappreciated actor. I agree with the other posters on the fine job he did on his various roles. Have you heard of,well I should say,have you read of the group I would like to form? Back in the article about people being “fim geeks” of which I most definitely am,I suggested the formation of a new group. I called it SOUP–Supporters Of Underappreciated Performers. Will you support me in starting this group,please? Give it a thought and write me back. Thanks!! P.S. Do you have cats too? Mine are one red tabby,two solid black,and one Russian Blue. They all have short coats and green eyes,except for one of the black cats has gold eyes. I love cats and always have. I am thrilled to find out about other cat people! Ha ha-”Cat People” that’s a movie! I’ve seen of course,since I’m a cat person.

Posted By Juana Maria : June 7, 2012 7:37 pm

Susan Doll: I have 4 cats,and I love them so much! I never heard of Hug Your Cat Day before! Wow! I don’t really need a special day to hug my kitties! They follow me around and not just when they are hungry. I never knew very much about James Mason’s personal life before your article. He was nice looking when he was younger and quite an underappreciated actor. I agree with the other posters on the fine job he did on his various roles. Have you heard of,well I should say,have you read of the group I would like to form? Back in the article about people being “fim geeks” of which I most definitely am,I suggested the formation of a new group. I called it SOUP–Supporters Of Underappreciated Performers. Will you support me in starting this group,please? Give it a thought and write me back. Thanks!! P.S. Do you have cats too? Mine are one red tabby,two solid black,and one Russian Blue. They all have short coats and green eyes,except for one of the black cats has gold eyes. I love cats and always have. I am thrilled to find out about other cat people! Ha ha-”Cat People” that’s a movie! I’ve seen of course,since I’m a cat person.

Posted By Juana Maria : June 7, 2012 7:43 pm

Some of my favorite James Mason movies are:”Prisoner Of Zenda”,”Lord Jim”,”North by Northwest”(though sometimes I get sick of that movie!Please don’t judge me!),and of course as Captain Nemo in “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”,and can’t say “Lolita” because his character is a prevert and a criminal!
I have seen him in “the Desert Fox” but was not overly impressed! I did however like him in the film “Madame Bovary”. He was so sad in “A Star is Born” that I think I will not be watching that one again. I struggle with sad feelings too and can’t stand others to be so sad too. :(

Posted By Juana Maria : June 7, 2012 7:43 pm

Some of my favorite James Mason movies are:”Prisoner Of Zenda”,”Lord Jim”,”North by Northwest”(though sometimes I get sick of that movie!Please don’t judge me!),and of course as Captain Nemo in “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”,and can’t say “Lolita” because his character is a prevert and a criminal!
I have seen him in “the Desert Fox” but was not overly impressed! I did however like him in the film “Madame Bovary”. He was so sad in “A Star is Born” that I think I will not be watching that one again. I struggle with sad feelings too and can’t stand others to be so sad too. :(

Posted By An Interview With James Mason – 1967 – Past Daily Pop Chronicles | Past Daily : August 2, 2014 7:18 pm

[…] James Mason the Dark, Young God […]

Posted By Caleyo : June 11, 2019 11:00 am

My infatuation with James Mason the Dark Young God led to my real life affair with the singer of The Stranglers, Hugh Cornwell, who looked so much like him with a similar demeanor. I find Mason a beautifully complicated actor, and then discovering here his life as poet and cat lover makes sense. I totally get why he’s Lucy’s angel…

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