My TCM Classic Film Festival Schedule

Today marks the beginning of TCM’s Classic Film Festival taking place April 28-May 1. A number of people have asked me if I’m attending the festival this year but unfortunately I’m stuck at home writing about it. Personal budget constraints make my attendance impossible but there are a lot of film screenings and events taking place at the festival that I wish I could see. I thought it would be fun to imagine how I might have planned out my trip to TCM’s Classic Film Festival this year and share a few movie recommendations in the process.

I’d start my day on April 28th with a visit to Club TCM where you can meet and greet some of the people working at the network and enjoy a public display of Hollywood glamour photography shot by Jack Pashkovsky. THE MAN WHO SHOT HOLLYWOOD: JACK PASHKOVSKY exhibit is the first of its kind dedicated to Pashkovsky’s work and filmmaker Barry Avrich will be on hand to share his stories and reminiscences about the photographer. I enjoy looking at photos of classic Hollywood stars and Pashkovsky’s work isn’t particularly well known so I’d love to see his photos in person.

That evening I’d spend my time with Bernard Hermann’s daughter, Dorothy Herrmann, who will be in attendance during the screening of one of my favorite films from the 1940s, THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR (1947), which stars the beautiful Gene Tierney along with Rex Harrison and George Sanders followed by Robert Wise’s science fiction classic THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL (1951). Bernard Hermann scored both movies and it would be a real treat to watch them back-to-back. Hermann is one of our greatest film composers and as a soundtrack buff I’d really enjoy hearing what Dorothy Herrmann had to say about her father’s involvement with these two terrific films firsthand.

On the morning of April 29th I’d begin my day with a screening of BECKET (1964). This brilliantly acted historic epic is based on the life of King Henry II (Peter O’Toole) and dramatizes his complicated relationship with Archbishop Thomas Becket (Richard Burton). I’ve had the pleasure of seeing a screening of BECKET before but this time Peter O’Toole will be in attendance and I’d jump at the chance to see him discuss the film as well as his behind-the-scene antics with friend and co-star, Richard Burton. It promises to be a lively and fascinating event. Following BECKET I’d make time for the screening of Nicholas Ray’s BIGGER THAN LIFE (1956) starring James Mason and Barbra Rush. I haven’t had the chance to see this suburban melodrama yet and this would be a great opportunity to catch up with it. To sweeten the deal actress Barbara Rush will also be in attendance.

My next choice would be to catch the screening of Robert Mulligan’s TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD (1962). This beautifully shot film based on Harper Lee’s classic American novel about racial injustice in a small southern town has earned a special place in my heart over the years. The TCM Classic Film Festival screening will include a discussion about the movie with cast member Mary Badham who played Scout as well as Gregory Peck’s own children. In the evening you’d find me enjoying Roger Corman’s kooky horror comedy, THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1961) followed by William Castle’s THE TINGLER (1959) starring the late great Vincent Price. Director Roger Corman will be in attendance to discuss THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS and I suspect that the conversation will be fun and enlightening. New York’s Film Forum’s Bruce Goldstein will be introducing THE TINGLER.

On the morning of April 30th I’d plant myself outside Grauman’s Chinese Theatre to witness Peter O’Toole’s official handprint ceremony taking place there at 10am. One of my favorite films, Carol Reed’s THE THIRD MAN (1949), is also playing that morning. I adore Peter O’Toole so I wouldn’t miss his historic moment for anything but if you can’t make the event, which will undoubtedly be pretty spectacular and generate a large crowd, I highly recommend catching THE THIRD MAN screening. Afterward I’d make my way over to THE PARENT TRAP (1961); A TRIBUTE TO HAYLEY MILLS event where Mills herself will be in attendance. Like a lot of kids I grew up watching Hayley Mills in Walt Disney films and I absolutely love her. Forget the 1998 remake, the original PARENT TRAP is one of the best live-action movies Disney ever produced and this special screening should be a real treat.

Festival Guests Peter O’Toole, Richard Roundtree and Hayley Mills

Otto Preminger is one of my favorite directors so my next stop would be at THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM (1955) screening. The film provided Frank Sinatra with one of his best roles playing a drug addicted musician trying to get clean. It also features a terrific score from Elmer Bernstein as well as good supporting performances from Kim Novak, Darren McGavin and Eleanor Parker. Vicki Preminger along with Nancy and Tina Sinatra will also be in attendance. I absolutely love Nancy Sinatra so this would be a great opportunity to see her in person! Following THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM I’d make time for the excellent Henry Hathaway film NIAGRA (1953), which features Marilyn Monroe and Joseph Cotton in two of their best roles. This Technicolor noir contains some incredible location shots, which should look amazing on screen. Author and film scholar Foster Hirsch will be in attendance to discuss the film.

In the evening I’d have a tough time trying to choose between seeing a screening of George Cukor’s excellent gothic thriller GASLIGHT (1944), Fellini’s decade defining LA DOLCE VITA (1960) and Gordon Park’s iconic SHAFT (1971), but I’m pretty sure SHAFT would win out. I’ve never had the opportunity to see a theatrical screening of the film and with the movie’s star, Richard Roundtree, in attendance it’s sure to be a night to remember. I’d end my day with a midnight screening of the classic Universal monster movie THE MUMMY (1932) featuring the one and only Boris Karloff. The film is being presented by Ron Perlman who I happen to think is one of the more interesting actors working today.

Things get a bit complicated on May 1st since a lot of films haven’t been announced yet but as of now I’d begin my day by attending the 9am screening of Sidney Lumet’s powerful social drama and media critique, NETWORK (1976). The recently deceased director has been on my mind a lot lately and this is a great opportunity to revisit one of his Oscar winning films. My next choice would be extremely tough to make so I might end up flipping a coin and trying to decide if I’d see my favorite James Bond film, GOLDFINGER (1964), Hitchcock’s THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY (1955) or attend another Tribute to Hayley Mills, which also features a screening of Bryan Forbes’ WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND (1961). The rarely screened WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND would undoubtedly win out with Hayley in attendance but I’ve always wanted to see a theatrical screening of GOLDFINGER.

The last two films I’d try and make time for are George Steven’s excellent romantic drama A PLACE IN THE SUN (1951) starring Montgomery Clift, Shelley Winters and the recently deceased Elizabeth Taylor followed by an evening screening of one of my favorite movie musicals, WEST SIDE STORY (1961). One of the stars of WEST SIDE STORY, the handsome George Chakiris, will be in attendance and this final screening promises to be a great end to the festivities. That’s a lot of movies and if I followed my own schedule I’d probably be utterly exhausted by Monday morning, but this girl can dream and she likes to dream big!

If you happen to be attending the festival please keep in mind that the schedule is subject to change at any time but it’s a good idea to plan ahead so you don’t miss any of the movies you want to see. For more information about all the films being shown at TCM’s Classic Film Festival please visit the official Festival website, which is updated regularly.

Some more recommendations:

The Los Angeles TimesTCM Classic Film Festival: ‘Night Flight,’ ‘The Constant Nymph,’ ‘Hoop-La’: All-star casts shine in seldom-seen films from the 1930s and ’40s

LA WeeklyTCM Classic Film Festival: 12 Highlights

28 Responses My TCM Classic Film Festival Schedule
Posted By suzidoll : April 28, 2011 12:11 pm

Well, this confirms it. We have such similar tastes, right down to Hayley Mills. I am so envious of people who are attending this. However, a friend of mine and I are saving up to go next year for sure.

My only deviation from your schedule would be Becket. Out of loyalty to Elvis, I could not go see the film. Becket was bankrolled from the projected profits of Elvis’s movie Roustabout. Hal Wallis used Elvis’s movies to secure funding for more prestigious fare. When Elvis read in the trades that Becket was made possible because of Roustabout, it dawned on him that Wallis had no intention of ever casting him in a serious film,and he sort of threw in the towel on his acting career.

Interestingly, I am showing Cat on a Hot Tin Roof tonight for an audience and speaking on Elizabeth Taylor and her career. I will be mentioning the quirky stuff she did in the 60s and 70s, including Boom. I found a piece you wrote on Boom, which I will reference. Yours was the only article I found to give it a fair shake.

Posted By suzidoll : April 28, 2011 12:11 pm

Well, this confirms it. We have such similar tastes, right down to Hayley Mills. I am so envious of people who are attending this. However, a friend of mine and I are saving up to go next year for sure.

My only deviation from your schedule would be Becket. Out of loyalty to Elvis, I could not go see the film. Becket was bankrolled from the projected profits of Elvis’s movie Roustabout. Hal Wallis used Elvis’s movies to secure funding for more prestigious fare. When Elvis read in the trades that Becket was made possible because of Roustabout, it dawned on him that Wallis had no intention of ever casting him in a serious film,and he sort of threw in the towel on his acting career.

Interestingly, I am showing Cat on a Hot Tin Roof tonight for an audience and speaking on Elizabeth Taylor and her career. I will be mentioning the quirky stuff she did in the 60s and 70s, including Boom. I found a piece you wrote on Boom, which I will reference. Yours was the only article I found to give it a fair shake.

Posted By medusamorlock : April 28, 2011 1:25 pm

Well, gals, if this Morlock trio were there together we’d mostly be in the same venues, I think. How lovely that they are having Hayley Mills there — I’d take her in “The Trouble with Angels” possibly even over “The Parent Trap” but that’s because I have a thing for movie nuns. :-)

Suzi, I love the story about Elvis and the “Becket” betrayal. Surely a horrible blow to him and I agree with your boycott.

The Festival is surely a theater-hopper’s dream! Much happy viewing to the Morlock or two who are attending!

Posted By medusamorlock : April 28, 2011 1:25 pm

Well, gals, if this Morlock trio were there together we’d mostly be in the same venues, I think. How lovely that they are having Hayley Mills there — I’d take her in “The Trouble with Angels” possibly even over “The Parent Trap” but that’s because I have a thing for movie nuns. :-)

Suzi, I love the story about Elvis and the “Becket” betrayal. Surely a horrible blow to him and I agree with your boycott.

The Festival is surely a theater-hopper’s dream! Much happy viewing to the Morlock or two who are attending!

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : April 28, 2011 1:50 pm

Hey, ladies! It’s nice to know that I’d be sitting with my fellow Morlocks if I was there. Isn’t Hayley Mills just wonderful? I loved her when I was a kid but as an adult I’ve gained a whole new appreciation of her. She’s tops! I love her in TROUBLE WITH ANGELS too.

My deep love for BECKET and the team-up of O’Toole with his pal Richard Burton surpasses any feelings I may have about the production history. I do love Elvis though and that story is fascinating so thanks for sharing it, Suzi.

The CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF screening sounds like it will be a lot of fun and I’m glad you could make use of my notes on BOOM. Recently the movie seems to be gaining a larger cult following and more fans but when I wrote that article there was literally nothing about the movie online so I wanted to change that.

I know that a few of the Morlocks are attending and we can keep up with their live coverage over at TCM’s Classic Film Festival site. I believe they’re live-blogging again, which should be fun to read. I love the excitement generated by the event and you can read it in their frantic live posts sometimes. Here’s the link:
http://www.tcm.com/festival/index.html#/general/liveCoverage

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : April 28, 2011 1:50 pm

Hey, ladies! It’s nice to know that I’d be sitting with my fellow Morlocks if I was there. Isn’t Hayley Mills just wonderful? I loved her when I was a kid but as an adult I’ve gained a whole new appreciation of her. She’s tops! I love her in TROUBLE WITH ANGELS too.

My deep love for BECKET and the team-up of O’Toole with his pal Richard Burton surpasses any feelings I may have about the production history. I do love Elvis though and that story is fascinating so thanks for sharing it, Suzi.

The CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF screening sounds like it will be a lot of fun and I’m glad you could make use of my notes on BOOM. Recently the movie seems to be gaining a larger cult following and more fans but when I wrote that article there was literally nothing about the movie online so I wanted to change that.

I know that a few of the Morlocks are attending and we can keep up with their live coverage over at TCM’s Classic Film Festival site. I believe they’re live-blogging again, which should be fun to read. I love the excitement generated by the event and you can read it in their frantic live posts sometimes. Here’s the link:
http://www.tcm.com/festival/index.html#/general/liveCoverage

Posted By AL : April 28, 2011 5:06 pm

Wonderful essay! Please give us details of your meeting with Dorothy Herrmann. Please?

Posted By AL : April 28, 2011 5:06 pm

Wonderful essay! Please give us details of your meeting with Dorothy Herrmann. Please?

Posted By Jenni : April 28, 2011 9:18 pm

Someday, perhaps I can attend. Thanks for sharing your picks, and also for the link to the live blog. Expecting interesting posts next week from those who attended! Also, you’d love the James Mason/Barbara Rush movie, Bigger than Life. Great melodrama, lush colors, I thought it a well acted movie when I saw it on tcm about a year ago. Is it on dvd yet?

Posted By Jenni : April 28, 2011 9:18 pm

Someday, perhaps I can attend. Thanks for sharing your picks, and also for the link to the live blog. Expecting interesting posts next week from those who attended! Also, you’d love the James Mason/Barbara Rush movie, Bigger than Life. Great melodrama, lush colors, I thought it a well acted movie when I saw it on tcm about a year ago. Is it on dvd yet?

Posted By AL : April 29, 2011 4:50 pm

Jenni–CRITERION recently released BIGGER THAN LIFE. Why has it taken so long for this film to begin getting the acclaim it deserves?

Posted By AL : April 29, 2011 4:50 pm

Jenni–CRITERION recently released BIGGER THAN LIFE. Why has it taken so long for this film to begin getting the acclaim it deserves?

Posted By Al Lowe : April 30, 2011 8:16 am

Barbara Rush, Nancy Sinatra and Hayley Mills too. Wow!

I recently watched DVDs of “Password,” with Allen Ludden as TV host, that aired from 1962 to 1967.

On one episode the two guest panelists were Nancy Sinatra and Woody Allen. Later, of course, Frank Sinatra married Mia Farrow, and still later, Woody got hooked up with Mia. I wish I could say that there was something amazing about that particular episode but there wasn’t.

Barbara Rush was a panelist on another “Password.” She was at her most beautiful then and she got a lot of close-ups, more than the guest stars usually got. On one day a couple of weeks ago I froze the picture of her on my DVD and as I passed the TV all that day I would stop and admire her. (Incidentally, Barbara made movies with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin and should be turning 84 this year.)

As for BECKET, in my humble opinion you are not missing much if you miss it. Yes, I like Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton a lot. Just not in this movie.

I’d love to be at the festival too. I wish I could do it.

Suzi, I understand your boycott of BECKETT. After making screen history with films starring Bogie and Cagney at Warners Wallis set up his own company at Paramount and made formula films wasting some great talents – Martin and Lewis, Lizabeth Scott and Elvis. (And, of course, I know you know this.)

Posted By Al Lowe : April 30, 2011 8:16 am

Barbara Rush, Nancy Sinatra and Hayley Mills too. Wow!

I recently watched DVDs of “Password,” with Allen Ludden as TV host, that aired from 1962 to 1967.

On one episode the two guest panelists were Nancy Sinatra and Woody Allen. Later, of course, Frank Sinatra married Mia Farrow, and still later, Woody got hooked up with Mia. I wish I could say that there was something amazing about that particular episode but there wasn’t.

Barbara Rush was a panelist on another “Password.” She was at her most beautiful then and she got a lot of close-ups, more than the guest stars usually got. On one day a couple of weeks ago I froze the picture of her on my DVD and as I passed the TV all that day I would stop and admire her. (Incidentally, Barbara made movies with Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin and should be turning 84 this year.)

As for BECKET, in my humble opinion you are not missing much if you miss it. Yes, I like Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton a lot. Just not in this movie.

I’d love to be at the festival too. I wish I could do it.

Suzi, I understand your boycott of BECKETT. After making screen history with films starring Bogie and Cagney at Warners Wallis set up his own company at Paramount and made formula films wasting some great talents – Martin and Lewis, Lizabeth Scott and Elvis. (And, of course, I know you know this.)

Posted By Kingrat : May 3, 2011 8:00 pm

Kimberly, I saw three of your picks. Dorothy Herrmann said that THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR was her father’s favorite score–”Definitely not PSYCHO!” Philip Dunne wrote the script for Hepburn and Tracy, and Darryl Zanuck thought of Norma Shearer for the lead. The print shown was not ideal, but what a great film with a marvelous score. DH said that her father always denied using some of the music for the film for his opera Wuthering Heights, but everyone else heard differently.

The print for BIGGER THAN LIFE was great, the best of all the films I saw. One of Ray’s best directing jobs, with an absolute confidence in using the wide screen for every kind of shot. Barbara Rush looked fantastic at 84, and we learned that she has been a good friend to Robert Osborne, who said, “If you’re lucky in your life, you meet someone like Barbara Rush.” To her surprise, noir festivals have begun showing BIGGER THAN LIFE because it is a dark and harrowing film.

WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND is one of the best films most people have never heard of. Unavailable on DVD, too, though I’ve seen a Portuguese-language version advertised! The print was quite good; I’d only seen a bad VHS library copy. Hayley Mills was a delight when Cari Beauchamp interviewed her. Best quotes: 1)Alan Bates made the most beautiful Jesus she had ever seen; 2) Hayley was offered LOLITA and wanted to play the role.

Posted By Kingrat : May 3, 2011 8:00 pm

Kimberly, I saw three of your picks. Dorothy Herrmann said that THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR was her father’s favorite score–”Definitely not PSYCHO!” Philip Dunne wrote the script for Hepburn and Tracy, and Darryl Zanuck thought of Norma Shearer for the lead. The print shown was not ideal, but what a great film with a marvelous score. DH said that her father always denied using some of the music for the film for his opera Wuthering Heights, but everyone else heard differently.

The print for BIGGER THAN LIFE was great, the best of all the films I saw. One of Ray’s best directing jobs, with an absolute confidence in using the wide screen for every kind of shot. Barbara Rush looked fantastic at 84, and we learned that she has been a good friend to Robert Osborne, who said, “If you’re lucky in your life, you meet someone like Barbara Rush.” To her surprise, noir festivals have begun showing BIGGER THAN LIFE because it is a dark and harrowing film.

WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND is one of the best films most people have never heard of. Unavailable on DVD, too, though I’ve seen a Portuguese-language version advertised! The print was quite good; I’d only seen a bad VHS library copy. Hayley Mills was a delight when Cari Beauchamp interviewed her. Best quotes: 1)Alan Bates made the most beautiful Jesus she had ever seen; 2) Hayley was offered LOLITA and wanted to play the role.

Posted By Dennis Cozzalio : May 3, 2011 8:58 pm

Kimberly: Other than BIGGER THAN LIFE, our TCM Festival schedules couldn’t have been more divergent! But there were so many great choices (and many of them akin to the ones forced upon dear Sophie), how could it have been any other way? Barbara Rush was wonderful– I’ve had a crush on her from long ago– as was the movie, and I got my Hayley Mills fix when she literally rubbed shoulders with me on her way through the lobby while I was waiting to see THE DEVIL IS A WOMAN on opening night!

I must admit, when I first saw this piece I had this rush of disappointment because I thought you’d actually been there and I’d missed you. Fellow Horror Dad R.H. Smith and I saw quite a bit of each other on Saturday– to the question of who was stalking who, we both have different answers! But I would have loved to have bumped into you, that’s for sure. Maybe next year?

I’ll be writing up my piece for SLANT/THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR in the next week or so– 15 movies in 3 days and one brief evening is a lot of stuff to process– but it was a wonderful time and I can’t wait to revisit it in writing. I will say though that my festival was heavily slanted toward pre-code delights like TAXI, TWO SECONDS, THIS IS THE NIGHT and HOOPLA, all of which were boundlessly wonderful. And seeing Kevin Brownlow introduce WENT THE DAY WELL? was probably matched only by Michael Schlesinger’s brilliantly funny intro to ONE TWO THREE, which was a genuine thrill to see projected after loving it on TV for 30 years or more.

I can’t wait for next year!

Posted By Dennis Cozzalio : May 3, 2011 8:58 pm

Kimberly: Other than BIGGER THAN LIFE, our TCM Festival schedules couldn’t have been more divergent! But there were so many great choices (and many of them akin to the ones forced upon dear Sophie), how could it have been any other way? Barbara Rush was wonderful– I’ve had a crush on her from long ago– as was the movie, and I got my Hayley Mills fix when she literally rubbed shoulders with me on her way through the lobby while I was waiting to see THE DEVIL IS A WOMAN on opening night!

I must admit, when I first saw this piece I had this rush of disappointment because I thought you’d actually been there and I’d missed you. Fellow Horror Dad R.H. Smith and I saw quite a bit of each other on Saturday– to the question of who was stalking who, we both have different answers! But I would have loved to have bumped into you, that’s for sure. Maybe next year?

I’ll be writing up my piece for SLANT/THE HOUSE NEXT DOOR in the next week or so– 15 movies in 3 days and one brief evening is a lot of stuff to process– but it was a wonderful time and I can’t wait to revisit it in writing. I will say though that my festival was heavily slanted toward pre-code delights like TAXI, TWO SECONDS, THIS IS THE NIGHT and HOOPLA, all of which were boundlessly wonderful. And seeing Kevin Brownlow introduce WENT THE DAY WELL? was probably matched only by Michael Schlesinger’s brilliantly funny intro to ONE TWO THREE, which was a genuine thrill to see projected after loving it on TV for 30 years or more.

I can’t wait for next year!

Posted By Dennis Cozzalio : May 3, 2011 9:02 pm

Kingrat: Did you hear echoes of Angelo Badalamenti in David Raksin’s score for BIGGER THAN LIFE? That movie has more than a passing kinship with BLUE VELVET, that’s for sure. So galvanizing to see it big and wide like that, and scary too.

Posted By Dennis Cozzalio : May 3, 2011 9:02 pm

Kingrat: Did you hear echoes of Angelo Badalamenti in David Raksin’s score for BIGGER THAN LIFE? That movie has more than a passing kinship with BLUE VELVET, that’s for sure. So galvanizing to see it big and wide like that, and scary too.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : May 6, 2011 2:52 pm

Thanks for all the comments everyone!

Kingrat – I appreciate the lowdown on those events! THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR is such a wonderful movie and how fun it must have been to see it with Bernard Herrmann’s daughter in attendance. I’m a huge Herrmann fan. Love his scores and I’m kind of obsessed with films soundtracks in general so what a treat that must have been. I’m going to have to catch up with BIGGER THAN LIFE on DVD soon and I’m so envious you saw WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND. That would been one I couldn’t have missed since it’s so tough to see and what a great cast! I saw it on TV many years ago but it’s only a vague memory now and I’d love to revisit it.

Dennis – It’s great that the festival has so much variety. There really is a wide selection of films for just about anyone and any tastes. My own schedule naturally leans heavily towards the ’60s & ’70s since they’re my favorite film decades and I was happy to see more films from those eras showing this year. I also made a point of listing just about any film with an element of “fantastique” to it. Given the option I’ll always select the films with ghosts, aliens, monsters and murder! I look forward to reading your festival posts.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : May 6, 2011 2:52 pm

Thanks for all the comments everyone!

Kingrat – I appreciate the lowdown on those events! THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR is such a wonderful movie and how fun it must have been to see it with Bernard Herrmann’s daughter in attendance. I’m a huge Herrmann fan. Love his scores and I’m kind of obsessed with films soundtracks in general so what a treat that must have been. I’m going to have to catch up with BIGGER THAN LIFE on DVD soon and I’m so envious you saw WHISTLE DOWN THE WIND. That would been one I couldn’t have missed since it’s so tough to see and what a great cast! I saw it on TV many years ago but it’s only a vague memory now and I’d love to revisit it.

Dennis – It’s great that the festival has so much variety. There really is a wide selection of films for just about anyone and any tastes. My own schedule naturally leans heavily towards the ’60s & ’70s since they’re my favorite film decades and I was happy to see more films from those eras showing this year. I also made a point of listing just about any film with an element of “fantastique” to it. Given the option I’ll always select the films with ghosts, aliens, monsters and murder! I look forward to reading your festival posts.

Posted By morlock jeff : May 7, 2011 8:51 pm

I have to tell you that BIGGER THAN LIFE was one of the revelations at this year’s festival. I couldn’t believe how many people had never seen, much less heard, of this movie, but the stunning 35mm print sent the audience into a kind of film festival delirium of “How many more great movies like this are out there that I don’t know about?” I suddenly realized that could be the mission of a festival like this – movies that film buffs take for granted that neophyte classic movie fans aren’t aware of yet. Other candidates for this would be Clara Bow in HOOP-LA, WENT THE DAY WELL?, Ernst Lubitsch’s DESIGN FOR LIVING and the inspiring amateur home movies of Sid Laverents.

Posted By morlock jeff : May 7, 2011 8:51 pm

I have to tell you that BIGGER THAN LIFE was one of the revelations at this year’s festival. I couldn’t believe how many people had never seen, much less heard, of this movie, but the stunning 35mm print sent the audience into a kind of film festival delirium of “How many more great movies like this are out there that I don’t know about?” I suddenly realized that could be the mission of a festival like this – movies that film buffs take for granted that neophyte classic movie fans aren’t aware of yet. Other candidates for this would be Clara Bow in HOOP-LA, WENT THE DAY WELL?, Ernst Lubitsch’s DESIGN FOR LIVING and the inspiring amateur home movies of Sid Laverents.

Posted By dukeroberts : May 8, 2011 6:41 pm

I too have a special place in my heart for Hayley Mills. I grew up watching all of her movies on the Disney Channel in the 80′s. And, in addition to the extent that Hal Wallis hampered Elvis’ film career, the Colonel could also be partially blamed for nixing any film that his boy had to share above the title credit or that would not yield enough songs to record a soundtrack album.

Posted By dukeroberts : May 8, 2011 6:41 pm

I too have a special place in my heart for Hayley Mills. I grew up watching all of her movies on the Disney Channel in the 80′s. And, in addition to the extent that Hal Wallis hampered Elvis’ film career, the Colonel could also be partially blamed for nixing any film that his boy had to share above the title credit or that would not yield enough songs to record a soundtrack album.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : May 9, 2011 3:24 am

Jeff – I’m itchin to see BIGGER THAN LIFE now! I’ve read some extremely flattering reviews of it and I love Ray’s work so I really should set aside some time to watch the Criterion DVD soon. There’s so many great lessor seen gems out there that you could easily build a film festival around them. I look forward to finding out what’s going to be on the schedule next year!

dukeroberts – Isn’t Hayley just terrific? She has great “mojo” as I like to say. I grew up on her Disney movies too and like a lot of kids I can’t imagine my childhood without them.

Posted By Kimberly Lindbergs : May 9, 2011 3:24 am

Jeff – I’m itchin to see BIGGER THAN LIFE now! I’ve read some extremely flattering reviews of it and I love Ray’s work so I really should set aside some time to watch the Criterion DVD soon. There’s so many great lessor seen gems out there that you could easily build a film festival around them. I look forward to finding out what’s going to be on the schedule next year!

dukeroberts – Isn’t Hayley just terrific? She has great “mojo” as I like to say. I grew up on her Disney movies too and like a lot of kids I can’t imagine my childhood without them.

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